Norwegian neuroscientists elected to American Philosophical Society

April 27, 2015

May-Britt and Edvard Moser, from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, were elected members of the American Philosophical Society at the society's semiannual meeting on 25-26 April in Philadelphia.

The APS is the oldest "learned society" in the United States, founded by Benjamin Franklin in 1743. The Society promotes useful knowledge in the sciences and humanities through excellence in scholarly research, professional meetings, publications, library resources, and community outreach.

Membership in the APS is entirely honorary and reflects extraordinary accomplishments in all fields of intellectual endeavor. Members are nominated and elected by their peers in the Society.

The Mosers, both neuroscientists, were recipients of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They have previously been honored by the APS with the 2014 Karl Spencer Lashley Award, "in recognition of their discovery of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex, and their pioneering physiological studies of the hippocampus, which have transformed ounderstanding of the neural computations underlying spatial memory." Professor Edvard Moser leads the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and May-Britt Moser is Director of the Centre for Neural Computation.

The society elects members in five classes; mathematical and physical sciences, biological sciences, social sciences, humanities and the arts, professions, leaders in public and private affairs.

For each of the five classes, a handful of American members are elected, and one or two international members. May-Britt and Edvard Moser were the only two international members elected to the Biological Sciences class. Among the Moser's fellow new international members are Thomas Piketty, Professor of Economics, Paris School of Economics, and Nicholas Stern, President of the British Academy and I G Patel Professor of Economics, Chair, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics, both of whom were elected to the Social Sciences class.

Nobel Laureate and NTNU alumnus Lars Onsager was elected a member of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences class in 1959.
-end-


Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Related Neuroscientists Articles from Brightsurf:

Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study.

Neuroscientists discover neural circuits that control hibernation-like behaviors in mice
Harvard Medical School neuroscientists have discovered a population of neurons in the hypothalamus that controls hibernation-like behavior, or torpor, in mice, revealing for the first time the neural circuits that regulate this state.

Neuroscientists find memory cells that help us interpret new situations
MIT neuroscientists have identified populations of cells that encode distinctive segments of an overall experience.

Neuroscientists develop models to identify internal states of the brain
A team of Princeton neuroscientists used a machine learning model to link a male Drosophila's songs to its observable behaviors and its internal states.

Brown neuroscientists discover neuron type that acts as brain's metronome
By measuring the fast electrical spikes of individual neurons in the touch region of the brain, Brown University neuroscientists have discovered a new type of cell that keeps time so regularly that it may serve as the brain's long-hypothesized clock or metronome.

Neuroscientists reverse some behavioral symptoms of Williams syndrome
In a study of mice, MIT neuroscientists have found that impaired myelination underlies the hypersociability seen in patients with Williams syndrome.

OU neuroscientists find brain pathway supporting an intersection of taste and pain
University of Oklahoma neuroscientists have found a pathway in the brain where taste and pain intersect in a new study that originally was designed to look at the intersection of taste and food temperature.

Neuroscientists at TU Dresden discover neural mechanisms of developmental dyslexia
Neuroscientist Professor Katharina von Kriegstein from TU Dresden and an international team of experts show in a recently published study that people with dyslexia have a weakly developed structure that is not located in the cerebral cortex, but at a subcortical processing stage; namely the white matter connectivity between the left auditory motion-sensitive planum temporale (mPT) and the left auditory thalamus (medial geniculate body, MGB).

UMass Amherst neuroscientists see clues to brain maturation in adolescent rats
One of the outstanding questions in neurodevelopment research has been identifying how connections in the brain change to improve neural function during childhood and adolescence.

Regret is a gambler's curse, neuroscientists say
The brain's orbitofrontal cortex deals with social interactions, including regret, and has been much studied with fMRI and EEG.

Read More: Neuroscientists News and Neuroscientists Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.