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Platelet-rich plasma for cosmetic facial procedures -- promising results, but evidence has limitations

April 27, 2018

April 27, 2018 - Most studies evaluating platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for facial rejuvenation and other cosmetic procedures have reported positive results, according to a critical review in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

But the research evidence supporting PRP for facial aesthetic procedures has important limitations - especially a lack of standardized PRP preparation and injection techniques, concludes the report by ASPS Member Surgeon Alexes Hazen, MD, and colleagues of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery at NYU Langone Health, New York. "More studies are needed to optimize PRP treatment techniques," Dr. Hazen comments, "Until that time, our paper may be useful in guiding clinical practice."

What's the Evidence on PRP for Facial Cosmetic Procedures?

Platelet-rich plasma injection has been extensively used in various clinical settings, including heart surgery, sports medicine, and wound care. In PRP procedures, a small sample of the patient's own blood is processed to release various growth factors from platelets - specialized blood cells involved in clotting. In recent years, PRP has become a "trending therapy" in aesthetic medicine, according to Dr. Hazen and colleagues. "Dermatologists and plastic surgeons are using the natural healing properties of platelets to improve the appearance and overall health of skin."

But while PRP procedures are growing in popularity, the research supporting their clinical effectiveness is limited. In a review and update, Dr. Hazen and colleagues analyzed published 22 published studies of PRP for specific types of facial aesthetic procedures.

Fourteen studies evaluated the use of PRP for facial rejuvenation. All studies reported positive aesthetic outcomes with PRP injection, on its own or combined with fat grafting. Reported benefits of PRP included improvements in the volume, texture, and tone of the facial skin and decreased appearance of wrinkles.

Six studies using PRP to treat a specific type of hair loss called androgenic alopecia (male or female pattern baldness) reported good results in terms of hair regrowth. "Androgenic alopecia is perhaps the most convincing indication for treatment with PRP," according to Dr. Hazen and colleagues. Another two studies found positive results with the use of PRP to treat facial acne scars.

But despite these encouraging results, the review highlights several limitations of the evidence on PRP for facial aesthetic procedures. Methods of PRP preparation and injection varied considerably; some reports provided no information on the preparation technique. The studies also lacked standardized, objective assessments of skin quality before and after PRP treatment. Other issues included a lack of control (comparison) groups and follow-up to determine whether the benefits of PRP persist over time.

Thus despite many studies reporting promising results, the true value of these procedures remains open to question. "To date, the question of whether PRP's cocktail of growth factors generates a more youthful appearance has not been definitively answered," the researchers write. They note that PRP injection appears to be safe, with a low complication rate.

Dr. Hazen and coauthors emphasize the need for formal randomized, controlled trials of PRP of facial cosmetic procedures - including standardized preparation techniques, standard outcome measures, and longer follow-up. They conclude: "In the interim, this review presents a consolidation of PRP treatment techniques currently in use, to help guide physicians in their own clinical practice."
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Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Click here to read "Evaluating Platelet-Rich Therapy for Facial Aesthetics and Alopecia: A Critical Review of the Literature."

DOI: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000004279

About Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

For more than 70 years, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® has been the one consistently excellent reference for every specialist who uses plastic surgery techniques or works in conjunction with a plastic surgeon. The official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® brings subscribers up-to-the-minute reports on the latest techniques and follow-up for all areas of plastic and reconstructive surgery, including breast reconstruction, experimental studies, maxillofacial reconstruction, hand and microsurgery, burn repair and cosmetic surgery, as well as news on medico-legal issues.

About ASPS

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. Representing more than 7,000 physician members, the society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the health, tax & accounting, finance, risk & compliance, and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer, headquartered in the Netherlands, reported 2017 annual revenues of €4.4 billion. The company serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide.

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit http://healthclarity.wolterskluwer.com and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

Wolters Kluwer Health

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