Nav: Home

86 million workdays lost to migraine in the UK every year

April 27, 2018

The equivalent of 86 million workdays are lost to migraine each year and close to £1 billion is spent on healthcare costs associated with the condition. It affects more than 23 per cent of adults with almost 200,000 attacks happening in the UK every day - making migraine the most common neurological reason for accident and emergency attendance.

Launched this week in the Houses of Parliament, the new report is the first to examine the economic cost of migraine in the UK since 2003, and calculates the impact migraine has on productivity levels due to 'absenteeism and presenteeism' - either being absent from work or less effective while at work.

The report, Society's headache: The socioeconomic impact of migraine, was produced by the Work Foundation and funded by Novartis. It calls for Government to join forces with national bodies to develop a long-term strategy to improve migraine care and support for employees in the workplace.

The Work Foundation's Dr James Chandler is the lead author of the report. He said: "Migraine is the most common and disabling headache disorder which affects more than 20 per cent of adults in the UK. It tends to affect people between the ages of 15-49, so strikes at a time when people are at their most productive, impacting on their careers, family life and with it, the wider economy.

"Despite its prevalence and debilitating effects, public and professional understanding of it is generally poor and it is often badly managed by the health system. The condition is normally treatable if managed correctly, so we are calling for Government to introduce measures to improve patient care and increase understanding of the condition. Employers also have a role to play. Better working practices - promoting 'good' work - would empower people to manage their condition more effectively at work, reducing the impact on individuals' careers and significantly improving productivity."

The report also suggests there are significant additional costs that are more difficult to quantify, as sufferers can deal with difficult symptoms such as anxiety between episodes that can impact on people's relationships and quality of life. Research suggests the condition is often linked to limitations in career advancement and potential earnings.
-end-
The report was produced as a result of in-depth interviews, as well as analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study, the Labour Force Survey and Public Health England Hospital Episode statistics.

You can download the full report and read the full recommendations here.

Lancaster University

Related Migraine Articles:

Disparities in migraine by sexual orientation
Survey data were used to examine the association between sexual orientation (exclusively heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, lesbian, gay or bisexual) and migraine.
Can you paint your migraine?
'Can you draw me a picture of your headache?' may sound like an unusual question - but drawings of headache pain provide plastic surgeons with valuable information on which patients are more or less likely to benefit from surgery to alleviate migraine headaches.
Acupuncture can reduce migraine headaches
Acupuncture can reduce migraine headaches compared to both sham (placebo) acupuncture and usual care, finds a new trial from China published by The BMJ today.
Migraine rats, medical facts
Migraine mechanisms are still far from being fully understood. Escalating data from animal models are 'fact-checking' the neurophysiological and behavioral correlates of the migraine experience in humans, and how they may be affected by current anti-migraine drugs or might translate into new therapies.
Connecting the dots in the migraine brain
This dMRI study pointed to the structural strengthening of connections involving subcortical regions associated with pain processing and weakening in connections involving cortical regions associated with hyperexcitability may coexist in migraine.
Predictors of chronic migraine
A review and meta-analysis found predictors of chronic migraine. Depression, high frequency attacks, medication overuse and allodynia increased the chances for new onset chronic migraine, while annual income -- US$ 50,000 showed a protective effect.
On nitroglycerin, cardiovascular homeostasis and...bam, migraine!
Researchers in Leiden, The Netherlands, found an exaggerated cardiovascular response to nitroglycerin infusion in migraine patients, suggesting an elevated systemic sensitivity to this compound in this population.
All roads lead to migraine
Dr. Samaira Younis, from the Danish Headache Center in Copenhagen, Denmark, shares her research results, which suggests there are no differences between migraine attacks clinical characteristics following administration of 2 different compounds in patients, CGRP and sildenafil, meaning they share common cellular signaling pathways.
Running away from exercise: The curious case of migraine
In spite of the widespread recommendation for regular physical activity as a strategy to manage migraine, for some patients, exercise can instead trigger migraine attacks.
Migraine prevention in children and adolescents
Two medicines already used to prevent migraine in adults also showed efficacy in adolescents with migraine.
More Migraine News and Migraine Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.