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Dr. Ramani Mani to receive AIAA aeroacoustics award

April 28, 2009

April 28, 2009 - Reston, Va. - The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) is pleased to announce that Dr. Ramani Mani of Schenectady, N.Y., has won the 2009 AIAA Aeroacoustics Award. Mani will receive the award at an awards luncheon at noon on May 12, as part of the 15th AIAA/Confederation of European Aerospace Societies Aeroacoustics Conference (30th AIAA Aeroacoustics Conference), May 11-13, at the Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, Fla.

Mani's recognition honors his continued discoveries and advancement in jet and fan aeroacoustics, especially in mean flow/acoustic shielding and prediction method for high tip speed fans. Dr. Mani retired from General Electric's Global Research Center in Niskayuna, N.Y., after a thirty-four year career specializing in aeroacoustics and unsteady fluid mechanics problems associated with gas turbines. Mani received his doctorate from the California Institute of Technology in 1967, and is an AIAA Associate Fellow.

The AIAA Aeroacoustics Award, consisting of a medal, certificate of citation and rosette pin, recognizes outstanding technical or scientific achievement resulting from an individual's contribution to the field of aircraft community noise reduction.
-end-
AIAA is the world's largest technical society dedicated to the global aerospace profession. With more than 35,000 individual members worldwide, and 90 corporate members, AIAA brings together industry, academia, and government to advance engineering and science in aviation, space, and defense. For more information, visit www.aiaa.org.

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics
1801 Alexander Bell Drive, Suite 500, Reston, VA 20191-4344
Phone: 703.264.7558 Fax: 703.264.7551 www.aiaa.org

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

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