Nav: Home

Stretchable interlaced-nanowire film for ultraviolet photodetectors with high response speed

April 28, 2019

Stretchable electronics, as a kind of "soft" electronic devices which can be stretched, deformed and wrapped onto nonplanar curved surfaces, have attracted tremendous attraction due to their potential applications in wearable electronics, implantable biomedical devices, and artificial electronic skin. So far, many types of stretchable electronic devices have been developed including stretchable transistors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), supercapacitors, photodetectors and sensors. Ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors have wide applications in crime investigation, biological analysis, fire monitoring, and UV irradiation detection. Stretchable UV photodetectors can be applied in much wider fields owing to their fascinating features of being stretchable, portable, implantable and wearable.

Metal oxides with wide bandgap, abundant reserves, large specific surface area, high aspect ratio and excellent stability, have been extensively studied as the active materials for high-performance UV photodetectors, especially the metal oxides nanowires (NWs) for the much higher photoresponse compared with their bulk or thin-film counterparts. However, due to the presence of a large number of surface defects related to trapping centers, most of the reported UV photodetectors based on pure binary metal oxide NWs, stretchable or not, usually display a very low response speed, which greatly limits their practical applications.

Recently, one research group from the Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, presented an interesting SnO2-CdS NW interlaced structure to fabricate stretchable UV photodetectors with high response speed in Science China Materials (DOI: 10.1007/s40843-019-9416-7).

Systematic investigations reveal that the interlaced-nanowire based photodetectors have lower dark current and much higher response speed (more than 100 times) compared with pure SnO2 nanowire based photodetectors. The relevant carrier generation and transport mechanism were also discussed. In addition, due to the formation of waved wrinkles on the surface of the NWs/PDMS layer during the prestretching cycles, the SnO2-CdS interlaced NW photodetectors display excellent electrical stability and stretching cyclability within 50% strain, without obvious performance degradation even after 150 stretching cycles. As a simple and effective strategy to fabricate stretchable UV photodetectors with high response speed, the interlaced nanowire structure can also be applied to other NW pairs, like ZnO-CdS interlaced-NWs.

Prof. Guozhen Shen said: "Our method provides a versatile way to fabricate high speed ultraviolet photodetectors with interlaced metal oxide nanowires-CdS nanowires, which is potential in future stretchable and wearable optoelectronic devices."
-end-
This research was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (61625404, 61888102 and 61574132), and the Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, CAS (QYZDY-SSWJWC004).

See the article: Ludong Li, Zheng Lou, Haoran Chen, Ruilong Shi and Guozhen Shen, "Stretchable SnO2-CdS interlaced-nanowire film ultraviolet photodetectors", Science China Materials. doi: 10.1007/s40843-019-9416-7 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40843-019-9416-7

Science China Press

Related Photodetectors Articles:

New breakthrough: Photomultiplication type all-polymer photodetectors with single carrier transport
The optimal photomultiplication (PM) type all-PPDs with PBDB-T:PZ1 (100:3, wt/wt) as active layers exhibit EQE of > 100% from 310 to 790 nm.
New technique prepares 2D perovskite single crystals for highest photodetectivity
A research group led by Professor Liu Shengzhong from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Dr.
Scientists develop ultrasensitive organic phototransistors based on novel hybrid-layered architecture
Professor Li Jia and Gao Yuanhong from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators developed a novel hybrid-layered architecture to improve the overall photodetection performance of organic phototransistors by simultaneously taking advantages of the charge-trapping effect and efficient carrier transport.
Skoltech researchers developed new perovskite-inspired semiconductors for electronic devices
The collaborative effort of researchers from Skoltech, SB RAS Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, and RAS Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics translated into the development of advanced lead-free semiconductors for solar cells, based on complex antimony and bismuth halides.
Stretchable interlaced-nanowire film for ultraviolet photodetectors with high response speed
Recently, one research group from the Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, presented an interesting SnO2-CdS NW interlaced structure to fabricate stretchable UV photodetectors with high response speed in Science China Materials.
More Photodetectors News and Photodetectors Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...