Widespread use of high-temperature superconductors on horizon

April 29, 2005

HOUSTON, April 29, 2005 - From improvements in cellular base stations to the development of more efficient electric transmission lines and energy storage systems, high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are nearing their commercial viability.

Two-time University of Houston graduate, Venkat Selvamanickam, will present a special seminar - "Second-generation HTS Conductors" - from 3 to 4 p.m., Monday, May 2, in room 102 of the Houston Science Center at UH. Part of the Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials (TcSAM) Special Seminar series, the event is free and open to the public.

Promising to meet the price-performance characteristics needed for widespread use of HTS, second-generation HTS conductors will have applications not only in space-age transit but also in advanced MRIs and better transmission lines. Selvamanickam, who received his doctorate from UH in materials engineering and master's degree from UH in mechanical engineering, will discuss the latest developments in the scale-up R&D of second-generation HTS conductors, as well as detail the remaining challenges for successful use of HTS in commercial applications.

The discovery of high-temperature superconductors that can operate using inexpensive liquid nitrogen as a coolant has opened doors to applying superconductivity to electric power devices. These HTS devices offer both performance advantages and environmental benefits.

Selvamanickam, currently a program manager of materials technology at SuperPower Inc. in Schenectady, New York, recently was named "Superconductor Industry Person of the Year 2004." Awarded by Superconductor Week, the leading publication in superconductor business and technology, this honor is the industry's most prestigious international distinction in the development and commercialization of superconductors. Given to only two recipients each year, Selvamanickam was recognized for his leadership, quality R&D and advocacy in the field.

SuperPower Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Intermagnetics General Corporation, uses core capabilities in materials, cryogenics and magnetics to develop electric power components such as underground transmission and distribution cables, transformers and fault current limiters, utilizing state-of-the-art second-generation HTS technology.

WHO:
Venkat Selvamanickam
Materials Expert

WHAT:
"Second-generation HTS Conductors"
TcSAM Special Seminar

WHEN:
3 to 4 p.m., Monday, May 2

WHERE:
University of Houston
Houston Science Center, Room 102
Entrance 16 off Cullen Boulevard
-end-
For more information about UH, visit the university's Newsroom at www.uh.edu/newsroom.

To receive UH science news via e-mail, visit www.uh.edu/admin/media/sciencelist.html.

University of Houston

Related Superconductors Articles from Brightsurf:

Progress in electronic structure and topology in nickelates superconductors
Recently, superconductivity was discovered in the hole-doped nickelates, wh ich provide us a new platform to study the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity.

UCF researcher zeroes in on critical point for improving superconductors
Developing a practical ''room temperature'' superconductor is a feat science has yet to achieve.

Connecting two classes of unconventional superconductors
The understanding of unconventional superconductivity is one of the most challenging and fascinating tasks of solid-state physics.

Superconductors are super resilient to magnetic fields
A Professor at the University of Tsukuba provides a new theoretical mechanism that explains the ability of superconductive materials to bounce back from being exposed to a magnetic field.

New advance in superconductors with 'twist' in rhombohedral graphite
An international research team led by The University of Manchester has revealed a nanomaterial that mirrors the 'magic angle' effect originally found in a complex man-made structure known as twisted bilayer graphene -- a key area of study in physics in recent years.

A new way towards super-fast motion of vortices in superconductors discovered
An international team of scientists from Austria, Germany and Ukraine has found a new superconducting system in which magnetic flux quanta can move at velocities of 10-15 km/s.

Controlling superconductors with light
IBS scientists has reported a conceptually new method to study the properties of superconductors using optical tools.

Superconductors with 'zeitgeist' -- When materials differentiate between past and future
Physicists at TU Dresden have discovered spontaneous static magnetic fields with broken time-reversal symmetry in a class of iron-based superconductors.

Hydrogen blamed for interfering with nickelate superconductors synthesis
Prof. ZHONG Zhicheng's team at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering has investigated the electronic structure of the recently discovered nickelate superconductors NdNiO2. They successfully explained the experimental difficulties in synthesizing superconducting nickelates, in cooperation with Prof.

A closer look at superconductors
From sustainable energy to quantum computers: high-temperature superconductors have the potential to revolutionize today's technologies.

Read More: Superconductors News and Superconductors Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.