Argonne's Crabtree elected to National Academy of Sciences

April 29, 2008

ARGONNE, Ill. (April 29, 2008) - George W. Crabtree, a senior scientist and administrator at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for his excellence in original scientific research. Membership in the NAS is one of the highest honors given to a scientist or engineer in the United States. Crabtree will be inducted into the Academy next April during its 146th annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Crabtree, elected along with 71 others, brings the number of Argonne researchers elected to NAS to three. There are currently just over 2,000 active NAS members. Among the NAS's renowned members are Albert Einstein, Robert Oppenheimer, Thomas Edison, Orville Wright, and Alexander Graham Bell. Over 180 living Academy members have won Nobel Prizes.

Crabtree is director of Argonne's Materials Science Division and holds the title of Argonne Distinguished Fellow, the laboratory's highest scientific and engineering rank. The title, held by less than 30 Argonne employees, is comparable in stature to an endowed chair at a top-ranked university and recognizes exceptional contributions in a person's field.

Crabtree is a noted expert in the field of superconductive materials. He has won numerous awards for his pioneering research in the field, and is work has been frequently cited by other researchers. He holds a Ph.D. degree in Condensed Matter Physics from University of Illinois at Chicago, an M.S. degree in Solid State Physics from the University of Washington and a B.S. degree in Science Engineering from Northwestern University.
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About the National Academy of Sciences

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit honorific society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furthering science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Established in 1863, the National Academy of Sciences has served to "investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art" whenever called upon to do so by any department of the government. For more information, or for the full list of newly elected members, visit http://national-academies.org/.



About Argonne


Argonne National Laboratory brings the world's brightest scientists and engineers together to find exciting and creative new solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation's first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America's scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science.

DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

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