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EAU Research Foundation organizes meeting in Amsterdam highlighting translational research results

April 29, 2009

On 22 and 23 June 2009, the Prostate Cancer Translational Research in Europe (PCTRE) meeting will be held in the Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam (NL). Translational research transforms scientific discoveries arising from laboratory, clinical or population studies into clinical applications to reduce cancer incidence, morbidity and mortality.

The European Association of Urology (EAU) provides an excellent forum to disseminate knowledge in specialised meetings. Therefore, the EAU Research Foundation has taken the initiative for this meeting.

The focus is on prostate cancer, the most common male malignancy in most European countries with 346,000 new cases diagnosed each year in Europe. Research efforts have increased steadily over the past two decades. "However the funding of cancer in research is very competitive", says Jack Schalken, Nijmegen Medical Centre (NL). It is, therefore, of particular importance that within the European Union based framework programme many prostate cancer consortia were funded in the last 5 years totaling approximately € 40 million. "The translation of our understanding of prostate cancer development and progression to the bedside of the patient plays a pivotal role", Schalken, coordinator of PRIMA, one of the consortia, says. "Thus it is time to present the highlights of these efforts during this unique meeting".

Marion Bussemakers, EU project advisor at the Nijmegen Medical Centre, adds: "The European Union is keen to show the European public what is done with the money spent on prostate cancer research and to discuss the future of urologic research. Therefore Ms Maria Vidal, Scientific Officer, DG Research, European Commission, will be joining the meeting."

How will diagnostics and therapy of prostate cancer change in future? Diagnostics has already changed with the PCA3 marker. Final results from the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer, recently unveiled at the 24th Annual EAU Congress in Stockholm (SE), show that prostate cancer screening reduces deaths by 20 per cent. And there is more to come. "The Prima consortium," according to Prof. Jack Schalken, "has yielded three new lead compounds for the treatment of prostate cancer." These new compounds will be introduced in Amsterdam.

Top speakers will be recruited from 8 European Union framework programmes. Researchers, EU officials and representatives of the patient advocacy groups are invited to join the meeting. Furthermore, US based scientists will join to see how 'across the pond' collaboration can be improved. The faculty includes world-reknowned urologists such as Anders Bjartell, Freddie Hamdy, Peter Mulders and Per-Anders Abrahamsson.

The programme includes, among other things, the following highlights: Molecular genetics of prostate cancer, From molecular target to clinical molecular diagnostics, Targeted therapies and a round table discussion on 'Biomarkers in prostate cancer, where do we go?'

A press conference will be organised on Monday 22 June at 17:00 hours. Registration is free for media representatives.

For more information and registration, please visit http://pctre2009.uroweb.org
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European Association of Urology

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