Use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes among women of reproductive age in US

April 29, 2019

Bottom Line: Cigarette use was lower among pregnant women in the United States (8 percent) than among nonpregnant women (14.3 percent) but rates of e-cigarette use were almost identical (3.6 percent for pregnant women and 3.3 percent for nonpregnant women) in a study based on national health survey data. The study included data for 1,071 pregnant and 26,849 nonpregnant women (18 to 44 years old) from 2014 to 2017. E-cigarette use was more common among pregnant women who also smoke cigarettes (38.9 percent) than among nonpregnant women who use both kinds of cigarettes (13.5 percent). The small size of the group of pregnant women in the study means that the precision of the estimates about how common cigarettes and e-cigarettes are may be limited. Research starting in the preconception period is needed to understand changing patterns of cigarette and e-cigarette use among women.

Authors: Wei Bao, M.D., Ph.D., University of Iowa, Iowa City, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.0658)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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JAMA Pediatrics

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