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Biofabrication drives tissue engineering in 2019

April 29, 2020

New Rochelle, NY, April 28, 2020--In the quest to engineer replacement tissues and organs for improving human health, biofabrication has emerged as a crucial set of technologies that enable the control of precise architecture and organization. A new article reviews the impacts of biofabrication in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine over the previous year. The article is reported in Tissue Engineering, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click to read the article for free on the Tissue Engineering website through May 28, 2020.

In "Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine 2019: the Role of Biofabrication--A Year in Review", Tiago Ramos, University College of London, UK, and Lorenzo Moroni, Maastricht University, the Netherlands, discuss the growing field of biofabrication and its recent impacts on tissue engineering and other disciplines. The authors first clarify terminology, including the concepts of bioassembly, bioprinting, and bioinks. They then catalog and highlight the developments in the 3D bioprinting of several specific tissue models, discussing both the extrusion-based methods and the newer optical fabrication techniques of stereolithography, laser-induced forward transfer, and two-photon lithography. Finally, developments are explored in the area of 4D bioprinting--the time-dependent modification of fabricated constructs.

"Drs. Ramos and Moroni, both leaders in the field of bioprinting and biofabrication, brilliantly detail the rising impact of printing on the tissue engineering community," says Tissue Engineering Co-Editor-in-Chief John P. Fisher, PhD, Fischell Family Distinguished Professor & Department Chair, and Director of the NIH Center for Engineering Complex Tissues at the University of Maryland. "The unique capabilities 3D printing--precision, flexibility, and personalization--have driven its growth in medicine, and the critical, recent success are nicely detailed in this review."
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About the Journal

Tissue Engineering is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online and in print in three parts: Part A, the flagship journal published 24 times per year; Part B: Reviews, published bimonthly, and Part C: Methods, published 12 times per year. Led by Co-Editors-in-Chief Antonios G. Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX, and John P. Fisher, PhD, Fischell Family Distinguished Professor & Department Chair, and Director of the NIH Center for Engineering Complex Tissues at the University of Maryland, the Journal brings together scientific and medical experts in the fields of biomedical engineering, material science, molecular and cellular biology, and genetic engineering. Leadership of Tissue Engineering Parts B (Reviews) and Part C (Methods) is provided by Katja Schenke-Layland, PhD, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Heungsoo Shin, PhD, Hanyang University; and John A. Jansen, DDS, PhD, Radboud University, and Xiumei Wang, PhD, Tsinghua University respectively. Tissue Engineering is the official journal of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS). Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Tissue Engineering website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Stem Cells and Development, Human Gene Therapy, and Advances in Wound Care. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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