Nav: Home

Innovative treatment restores sight in patient

April 30, 2019

Innovative treatment has improved the vision of a patient suffering from a rare cancer-related syndrome affecting the eye, new research in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology reports.

In the first study of its kind, a team of researchers from the University of Surrey and Royal Surrey County Hospital, supported by the electrophysiology department of Moorfields Eye Hospital, investigated a new approach in treating melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR), a rare auto-immune syndrome occurring in patients with cancer, which can cause night blindness and progressive vision loss.

Researchers, working with a 73 year old patient suffering with MAR, investigated if long acting steroid implants injected into the eye could improve vision and reduce symptoms. The implants slowly release fluocinolone acetonide, a corticosteroid, into the eye which prevent anti-retinal antibodies attacking proteins in the organ. Current therapies to treat patients with MAR are limited in their effectiveness and may be harmful to some.

After one week of treatment improvements in the vision of the patient were detected and detailed examination of the patient's eye revealed that abnormalities previously observed such as reduced electroretinogram recordings had partly resolved, which is consistent with improved inner retinal cell function. Monitoring the patient over a three year period, researchers found that vision remained stable with visual acuity remaining at 20/20.

Simon Taylor, Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Surrey and Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon at the Royal Surrey County Hospital, said: "To our knowledge, this is the first time the vision of a patient with melanoma-associated retinopathy has been treated and significantly improved with long acting steroid implants. This offers a possible alternative treatment option to patients, whose quality of live is significantly reduced due to the symptoms of this debilitating ailment."

The patient who underwent this pioneering treatment, said: "Every day I am extremely grateful to have had this treatment. After being diagnosed with serious melanoma, and during treatment, I developed problems with my eyes: deterioration of my sight, discomfort and extreme disturbance. Prior to this I had enjoyed perfect sight.

"I am so thankful to Professor Taylor and the team at the Royal Surrey County Hospital for all the care I have received and restoring my eyesight."
-end-


University of Surrey

Related Retinopathy Articles:

Scientists identify a potential treatment candidate for early type 2 diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is one of the main vascular complications of type 2 diabetes, and the most common cause of visual deterioration in adults.
No need to draw blood -- smart photonic contact lens for diabetic diagnosis and retinopathy treatment
Sei Kwang Hahn and his research team from POSTECH developed a smart LED contact lens.
Scientists identify a possible new treatment for diabetic retinopathy
About 1 in 3 diabetic patients develops diabetic retinopathy (DR), which can impair vision and lead to blindness.
Asthma medication inhibits changes in diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes mouse
A new study found the asthma medication montelukast (brand name Singulair) can inhibit early changes in diabetic retinopathy, the eye disease which develops due to diabetes, in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes.
Earlier detection of diabetic retinopathy with smartphone AI
Equipping a smartphone to capture retinal images and utilizing artificial intelligence to interpret them may help overcome barriers to ophthalmic screening for people with diabetes, new Kellogg Eye Center research shows.
CHOP researchers develop easy-to-implement predictive screening tool for retinopathy
A multi-hospital collaboration led by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found a simple method of determining which premature infants should be screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).
Researchers develop new tools in the fight against diabetic blindness
Estimates are that 600 million people will have some sort of diabetic retinopathy by 2040.
The microenvironment of diabetic retinopathy supports lymphatic neovascularization
'We asked whether proliferative diabetic retinopathy involves the growth of new lymphatic vessels in addition to blood vessels -- and, indeed, we found expression of lymphatic markers in the PDR tissues.' The new study, conducted at the University of Helsinki, Finland, was published in the Journal of Pathology.
Interventions increase attendance for diabetic retinopathy screening, says study
Targeted interventions can significantly improve screening for diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes and the leading cause of vision loss amongst working-age adults in the Western word, according to a new Cochrane Systematic Review.
Artificial intelligence detects diabetic retinopathy and related eye diseases among patients
A computing system with artificial intelligence that can learn to do tasks that normally require human intelligence could detect retinal images that did and did not show diabetic retinopathy and related eye diseases in multiethnic populations.
More Retinopathy News and Retinopathy Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Meditations on Loneliness
Original broadcast date: April 24, 2020. We're a social species now living in isolation. But loneliness was a problem well before this era of social distancing. This hour, TED speakers explore how we can live and make peace with loneliness. Guests on the show include author and illustrator Jonny Sun, psychologist Susan Pinker, architect Grace Kim, and writer Suleika Jaouad.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.