Nav: Home

Australian blue tongue lizard ancestor was round-in-the-tooth

April 30, 2019

Reconstruction of the most complete fossil lizard found in Australia, a 15 million year old relative of our modern blue tongues and social skinks named Egernia gillespieae, reveals the creature was equipped with a robust crushing jaw and was remarkably similar to modern lizards.

A new study lead by Flinders University PHD student Kailah Thorn, published in the journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology, combined the anatomy of of living fossils with DNA data to put a time scale on the family tree of Australia's 'social skinks'.

"This creature looked like something in-between a tree skink and a bluetongue lizard. It would have been about 25 cm long, and unlike any of the living species it was equipped with robust crushing jaws," says Ms Thorn.

The results show that our Australia's bluetongue lizards split from Egernia as early as 25 million years ago.

"The new fossil is unusually well-preserved, with much of the skull, and some limb bones, all from a single individual. It belongs to the genus Egernia, a modern species in this group which are often called 'social skinks' and are known for living in family groups, sharing rocky outcrops and hollow tree stumps."

Remarkably similar to modern social skinks, E. gillespieae instead is equipped with rounded crushing teeth and a deep, thick jaw.

The fossils are from the Riversleigh World Heritage fossil deposits in northwest Queensland, and were named after Dr Anna Gillespie, a UNSW palaeontologist responsible for preparing many of the spectacular fossils from that area.

"I have been preparing the Riversleigh fossil material for quite a few years now and lizard bones are rare elements. When the jaw appeared and was quickly followed by associated skull elements, I had a good feeling it would be a significant addition to the Riversleigh reptile story," says Dr Gillespie.
-end-
The paper can be found here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/kl1rsgmwxsk7zue/A%20new%20scincid%20lizard%20from%20the%20Miocene%20of%20Northern%20Australia%20and%20the%20evolutionary%20history%20of%20social%20skinks%20Scincidae%20Egerniinae.pdf?dl=0

Flinders University

Related Fossil Articles:

Fossil fish gives new insights into the evolution
An international research team led by Giuseppe Marramà from the Institute of Paleontology of the University of Vienna discovered a new and well-preserved fossil stingray with an exceptional anatomy, which greatly differs from living species.
What color were fossil animals?
Dr. Michael Pittman of the Vertebrate Palaeontology Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong led an international study with his PhD student Mr.
New Cretaceous fossil sheds light on avian reproduction
A team of scientists led by Alida Bailleul and Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first fossil bird ever found with an egg preserved inside its body.
Fossil deposit is much richer than expected
Near the Dutch town of Winterswijk is an Eldorado for fossil lovers.
Researchers add surprising finds to the fossil record
A newly discovered fossil suggests that large, flowering trees grew in North America by the Turonian age, showing that these large trees were part of the forest canopies there nearly 15 million years earlier than previously thought.
More Fossil News and Fossil Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...