Image-guided biopsy can help patients avoid unnecessary kidney removal

May 01, 2006

Percutaneous image-guided biopsy of renal masses is safe and accurate, and it frequently alters clinical decision making, says a new study from the University of Michigan.

For the study, the researchers reviewed 153 kidney biopsies in 126 patients. The researchers found that more than 60% of patients had a change in their treatment--whether surgery, tumor ablation, chemotherapy or radiation--due to biopsy results, and that as many as 75 unnecessary kidney removals were potentially avoided.

"When a patient has a kidney mass, options include an open surgical procedure or an image-guided percutaneous biopsy. Percutaneous means that the procedure is performed through the skin, through a tiny incision (only 3-4 mm). Imaging guidance (either ultrasound or CT) allows us to watch our needle as it enters the mass, decreasing the risk of damage to adjacent structures and ensuring that we are sampling the correct tissue," said Katherine Maturen, MD, lead author of the study.

According to the researchers, these procedures are performed under conscious sedation with local anesthesia to numb the skin where the needle will enter. The procedure takes about half an hour in most cases, and after a four-hour observation period, patients are free to go home.

According to the researchers, although the acceptance of percutaneous image-guided biopsy has increased among physicians in recent years, many continue to avoid the biopsies because of concerns about poor sensitivity and a high rate of non-diagnostic biopsy, all based on data from old techniques including fine needle aspiration. "We felt it was important to demonstrate that newer core biopsy techniques have a much greater success rate, and to quantify the extent to which these biopsies altered patient management," said Dr. Maturen.

"When a patient has a kidney mass, it isn't always clear what the treatment should be until we know the tissue type. Sometimes getting a small sample of tissue can make the difference between major surgery (partial or complete removal of the kidney) or a simple follow-up CT scan. If a mass is benign, a patient has been spared the loss of a kidney and may actually need no treatment at all. If a mass is malignant but something other than a cancer of kidney origin, the treatment may involve chemotherapy, radiation or another type of surgery entirely," said Dr. Maturen.

The full results of the study will be presented on Monday, May 1, 2006 during the American Roentgen Ray Society Annual Meeting in Vancouver, BC.
-end-
About ARRS
The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the U.S Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS Annual Meeting to take part in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations, symposiums, new issues forums and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The ARRS is named after Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895.

American College of Radiology

Related Chemotherapy Articles from Brightsurf:

Chemotherapy is used to treat less than 25% of people with localized sarcoma
UCLA researchers have found that chemotherapy is not commonly used when treating adults with localized sarcoma, a rare type of cancer of the soft tissues or bone.

Starved cancer cells became more sensitive to chemotherapy
By preventing sugar uptake, researchers succeeded in increasing the cancer cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic treatment.

Vitamin D could help mitigate chemotherapy side effects
New findings by University of South Australia researchers reveal that Vitamin D could potentially mitigate chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis and provide relief to cancer patients.

Less chemotherapy may have more benefit in rectal cancer
GI Cancers Symposium: Colorado study of 48 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy, found that patients receiving lower-than-recommended doses in fact saw their tumors shrink more than patients receiving the full dose.

Male fertility after chemotherapy: New questions raised
Professor Delb├Ęs, who specializes in reproductive toxicology, conducted a pilot study in collaboration with oncologists and fertility specialists from the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) on a cohort of 13 patients, all survivors of pediatric leukemia and lymphoma.

'Combo' nanoplatforms for chemotherapy
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from Harbin Institute of Technology, China have systematically discussed the recent progresses, current challenges and future perspectives of smart graphene-based nanoplatforms for synergistic tumor therapy and bio-imaging.

Nanotechnology improves chemotherapy delivery
Michigan State University scientists have invented a new way to monitor chemotherapy concentrations, which is more effective in keeping patients' treatments within the crucial therapeutic window.

Novel anti-cancer nanomedicine for efficient chemotherapy
Researchers have developed a new anti-cancer nanomedicine for targeted cancer chemotherapy.

Ending needless chemotherapy for breast cancer
A diagnostic test developed at The University of Queensland might soon determine if a breast cancer patient requires chemotherapy or would receive no benefit from this gruelling treatment.

A homing beacon for chemotherapy drugs
Killing tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts is a central challenge of cancer chemotherapy.

Read More: Chemotherapy News and Chemotherapy Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.