New MRI guided technique makes fibroid treatment 60 percent faster

May 01, 2006

A new MRI guided technique known as manual interleaved MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) safely treats fibroids in 60% less time than conventional MRgFUS, according to a new study by researchers from the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, MA.

For the study, researchers analyzed the results of 14 women with symptomatic fibroids who were treated with the rapid interleaved MRgFUS. The researchers found that interleaved MRgFUS permitted up to 127 sonications--sound wave pulses that break up the fibroid--in a three-hour treatment versus 60-70 sonications with the conventional technique in the same time span. The procedure had no serious adverse side-effects, even after a six-month follow up. In addition, 12 of the 14 patients had marked improvements in their symptoms on the follow-up visits.

"Basically, it allows the procedure to be performed faster--about 60% faster. The conventional method permits more than twice as many sonications can be performed during the same three-hour treatment," said George A. Holland, MD, lead author of the study

"Using this technique, women with fibroids can be treated faster and women that would not be considered for the treatment because of the size of their fibroid can now also be treated," he added.

The full results of the study will be presented on Monday, May 1, 2006 during the American Roentgen Ray Society Annual Meeting in Vancouver, BC.
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About ARRS
The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the U.S Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS Annual Meeting to take part in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations, symposiums, new issues forums and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The ARRS is named after Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895.

American College of Radiology

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