Biomarker predicts malignancy potential of HG-PIN lesions in the prostate

May 01, 2008

PHILADELPHIA - Men whose prostate cancer screenings show high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN) may find themselves in limbo, "stuck" between diagnoses - they are told prostate cancer has not yet developed, but it might, and they are advised to undergo repeated needle biopsies as a precaution.

Investigators from Spain have found a means of distinguishing between HG-PIN lesions destined to become cancerous and those which will remain benign. Their findings, reported in the May 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, could spare patients the discomfort and inconvenience of unnecessary needle biopsies.

The Spanish team found that expression of the PTOV1 gene in HG-PIN lesions is linked to prostate cancer development, and that the higher the expression, the more likely it is that subsequent biopsies will find cancer. The reverse is also true--lack of PTOV1 reduces the risk of prostate cancer.

"This is the first HG-PIN biomarker to be associated with prostate cancer development," said the study's lead author, Rosanna Paciucci, Ph.D., a researcher at the Vall d´Hebrón Hospital Research Institute in Barcelona. She says that when the results of this study are validated, the PTOV1 gene marker could be used to determine which men with HG-PIN are at substantial risk of developing prostate cancer.

"Those patients with a high PTOV1 score should undergo an immediate repeat biopsy," Paciucci said. On the flip side, men who test low for PTOVI may not need to receive future "annoying and useless" biopsies, she said. "We estimate that we can save 40 percent of unnecessary biopsies - those that are repetitively negative and contain HG-PIN lesions that do not develop into cancer."

While the researchers do not know the precise biochemical function of PTOV1, they say they have found this protein promotes the proliferation of cancer cells when it is over-expressed, as it occurs in prostate cancer cells.

HG-PIN is defined as a pre-malignant lesion present in most cancerous prostates. Although a pre-malignant lesion shows many of the typical cellular changes observed in cancer, the lesion has not yet progressed fully to disease. Since HG-PIN lesions are also associated with the presence of cancer in many patients, men whose biopsies show HG-PIN are often re-biopsied until cancer is detected, Paciucci says.

In most recent studies, the average risk of cancer following a diagnosis of isolated HG-PIN in biopsy ranged from 20 percent to 30 percent, the researchers say. And while other researchers have found markers in HG-PIN lesions, none have been able to discriminate between lesions that will progress to cancer, the researchers say.

In this study, the research team analyzed HG-PIN lesions from 140 patients: the positive control group comprised 79 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer who had their prostate glands surgically removed and who had been earlier diagnosed with HG-PIN; the negative control group included 11 patients with bladder cancer who had both their diseased bladder and healthy prostate removed; and the study group comprised 50 patients diagnosed with HG-PIN but not prostate cancer. The study group had an average of 2.5 biopsies each between 2000 and 2004.

Finding that PTOV1 gene expression was elevated in HG-PIN associated with cancer, the investigators used tissue microarray and immunohistochemical analyses to see whether PTOV1 protein levels could discriminate these pre-malignant lesions from HG-PIN that did not develop into prostate cancer.

They considered both the number of cells that express the protein and the intensity of the expression, and derived a quantitative score (Hscore) that ranged from 0 to 300. From this, they calculated that an Hscore of 100 represented a highly sensitive malignancy threshold. "This means that when PTOV1 Hscore is equal or above 100 the possibility to find cancer in the subsequent biopsy is 90 percent," Paciucci said. "Currently, the diagnosis of cancer is made only when the cancer lesion is seen in the biopsy."

By adding the analysis of PTOV1, the positive predictive value (the chance that the HG-PIN lesion will become cancerous) of all samples, including those with a score of less than 100, is 34 percent, and the negative predictive value (the chance that the HG-PIN lesion will not become cancerous) is more than 95 percent, Paciucci says.

Paciucci cautions that the study results need to be confirmed among a larger study group. "From this validation we can expect to improve the current rate of early detection of cancer," she said.
-end-
The mission of the American Association for Cancer Research is to prevent and cure cancer. Founded in 1907, AACR is the world's oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research. The membership includes nearly 27,000 basic, translational, and clinical researchers; health care professionals; and cancer survivors and advocates in the United States and more than 70 other countries. AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise from the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancerthrough high-quality scientific and educational programs. It funds innovative, meritorious research grants. The AACR Annual Meeting attracts more than 17,000 participants who share the latest discoveries and developments in the field. Special Conferences throughout the year present novel data across a wide variety of topics in cancer research, treatment, and patient care. AACR publishes five major peer-reviewed journals: Cancer Research; Clinical Cancer Research; Molecular Cancer Therapeutics; Molecular Cancer Research; and Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. Its most recent publication and its sixth major journal, Cancer Prevention Research, is the only journal worldwide dedicated exclusively to cancer prevention, from preclinical research to clinical trials. The AACR also publishes CR, a magazine for cancer survivors, patient advocates, their families, physicians, and scientists. CR provides a forum for sharing essential, evidence-based information and perspectives on progress in cancer research, survivorship, and advocacy.

American Association for Cancer Research

Related Prostate Cancer Articles from Brightsurf:

Low risk of cancer spread on active surveillance for early prostate cancer
Men undergoing active surveillance for prostate cancer have very low rates - one percent or less - of cancer spread (metastases) or death from prostate cancer, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Urology®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA).

ESMO 2020: Breast cancer drug set to transform prostate cancer treatment
A drug used to treat breast and ovarian cancer can extend the lives of some men with prostate cancer and should become a new standard treatment for the disease, concludes a major trial which is set to change clinical practice.

Major trial shows breast cancer drug can hit prostate cancer Achilles heel
A drug already licensed for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers is more effective than targeted hormone therapy at keeping cancer in check in some men with advanced prostate cancer, a major clinical trial reports.

The Lancet: Prostate cancer study finds molecular imaging could transform management of patients with aggressive cancer
Results from a randomised controlled trial involving 300 prostate cancer patients find that a molecular imaging technique is more accurate than conventional medical imaging and recommends the scans be introduced into routine clinical practice.

Common genetic defect in prostate cancer inspires path to new anti-cancer drugs
Researchers found that, in prostate cancer, a mutation leading to the loss of one allele of a tumor suppressor gene known as PPP2R2A is enough to worsen a tumor caused by other mutations.

First prostate cancer therapy to target genes delays cancer progression
For the first time, prostate cancer has been treated based on the genetic makeup of the cancer, resulting in delayed disease progression, delayed time to pain progression, and potentially extending lives in patients with advanced, metastatic prostate cancer, reports a large phase 3 trial.

Men taking medications for enlarged prostate face delays in prostate cancer diagnosis
University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that men treated with medications for benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate) experienced a two-year delay in diagnosis of their prostate cancer and were twice as likely to have advanced disease upon diagnosis.

CNIO researchers confirm links between aggressive prostate cancer and hereditary breast cancer
The study has potential implications for families with members suffering from these types of tumours who are at an increased risk of developing cancer.

Distinguishing fatal prostate cancer from 'manageable' cancer now possible
Scientists at the University of York have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy.

Researchers find prostate cancer drug byproduct can fuel cancer cells
A genetic anomaly in certain men with prostate cancer may impact their response to common drugs used to treat the disease, according to new research at Cleveland Clinic.

Read More: Prostate Cancer News and Prostate Cancer Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.