Cold Spring Harbor Protocols features classic approaches for analyzing chromosomes

May 01, 2008

COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. (Thursday, May 1, 2008) - Recent discoveries have led to a revolution in the field of epigenetics, the study of gene regulation through the modulation of chromatin. These newly elaborated principles have brought the study of chromosomes and chromatin structure to the forefront of genetic research. This month's issue of Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (www.cshprotocols.org/TOCs/toc5_08.dtl) features two classic methods for chromosomal analysis.

"Mapping Protein Distributions on Polytene Chromosomes by Immunostaining" takes advantage of the formidable size and structure of the large polytene chromosomes found in Drosophila salivary glands. These easily dissected chromosomes allow mapping of chromosomal protein distributions at very high resolution. The protocol, written by Renato Paro (http://www.zmbh.uni-heidelberg.de/paro/), is freely accessible on the website for Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (http://www.cshprotocols.org/cgi/content/full/2008/6/pdb.prot4714).

The second featured method for May, "Karyotyping Mouse Cells," is drawn from the widely used laboratory manual Manipulating the Mouse Embryo (http://www.cshlpress.com/link/mmousep.htm). A karyotype is a visual presentation of a cell's chromosomes, and can be used as a test for quickly identifying chromosomal abnormalities. This method is freely accessible on the website for Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (http://www.cshprotocols.org/cgi/content/full/2008/6/pdb.prot4706).
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About Cold Spring Harbor Protocols:

Cold Spring Harbor Protocols (www.cshprotocols.org) is a monthly peer-reviewed journal of methods used in a wide range of biology laboratories. It is structured to be highly interactive, with each protocol cross-linked to related methods, descriptive information panels, and illustrative material to maximize the total information available to investigators. Each protocol is clearly presented and designed for easy use at the bench--complete with reagents, equipment, and recipe lists. Life science researchers can access the entire collection via institutional site licenses, and can add their suggestions and comments to further refine the techniques.

About Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press:

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press is an internationally renowned publisher of books, journals, and electronic media, located on Long Island, New York. Since 1933, it has furthered the advance and spread of scientific knowledge in all areas of genetics and molecular biology, including cancer biology, plant science, bioinformatics, and neurobiology. It is a division of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, an innovator in life science research and the education of scientists, students, and the public. For more information, visit www.cshlpress.com.

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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