Rotator cuff tears: Are they all in the family?

May 01, 2009

ROSEMONT, IL--People with relatives who have experienced rotator cuff tears are at increased risk of similar tendon tears themselves, according to a study published in the May 2009 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS). "This strongly suggests genetic predisposition as a possible cause for rotator cuff disease," said Robert Z. Tashjian, MD, associate professor of orthopaedic surgery, University of Utah School of Medicine Orthopaedic Center in Salt Lake City.

By using the Utah Population Database combined with the University of Utah Health Sciences Data Warehouse numbers, researchers found an increased risk for these tears in family members of patients with rotator cuff tears. The risk extends out and beyond third-cousin relationships (Third cousins are the great-great-grandchildren of one's great-great-grandparents.)

"While we have not determined the exact genetic component," said Dr. Tashjian, "our family history data supports that heredity plays a role in the development of rotator cuff tearing."

This problem usually affects people in their 50s and 60s. It is believed to have both mechanical and environmental influences; however, scientists unclear as to exactly why it occurs, have several theories including:The potential impact of this research is that it is a springboard for attempting to identify an exact genetic component for this injury. Dr. Tashjian and his colleagues are currently collecting blood samples for DNA analysis of patients with rotator cuff tears, which will be used later for various genetic analyses to determine the exact genetic component.

The results of this research have potential long term implications, including:While an exercise program would not completely prevent development of rotator cuff disease, it may limit the negative impact on shoulder function.

The research results can also lead to future treatment options. "Rotator cuff healing is often incomplete and identifying a possible genetic link to the disease may provide targets for biologic treatments to improve the healing rates," noted Dr. Tashjian.
-end-
More Information: The Utah Population Database is a multigenerational database including, birth, death and family history data on over 10 million individuals. The University of Utah Health Sciences Data Warehouse includes all medical record information on more than two million individuals evaluated and treated at the University of Utah. The combined database allows a hereditary analysis of any piece of the medical record of these individuals stored in the Data Warehouse.

Disclosure: In support of their research for or preparation of this work, one or more of the authors received, in any one year, outside funding or grants in excess of $10,000 from the National Institutes of Health-National Library of Medicine (NLM R01 LM009331). Partial support less than $10,000 for all datasets within the Utah Population Database was provided by the University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute. Neither they nor a member of their immediate families received payments or other benefits or a commitment or agreement to provide such benefits from a commercial entity. No commercial entity paid or directed, or agreed to pay or direct, any benefits to any research fund, foundation, division, center, clinical practice, or other charitable or nonprofit organization with which the authors, or a member of their immediate families, are affiliated or associated.

JBJS (www.jbjs.org)

AAOS (www.aaos.org)

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Related Rotator Cuff Articles from Brightsurf:

Exercise and PRP promising for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
''Conservative treatments that provide alternatives to surgery are needed for wheelchair users with spinal cord injury who have recalcitrant shoulder pain.

Marshall School of Medicine team explores surgery technology resulting in fewer incisions
Through the use of a newly developed needle arthroscope, incisionless and single-incision surgical procedures are possible for repairing certain types of knee and shoulder injuries suggests a series of Marshall University studies published in Arthroscopy Techniques, a companion to Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery.

MRI findings predict shoulder stiffness for rotator cuff tears
Two MRI findings--joint capsule edema and thickness at the axillary recess, specifically--proved useful in predicting stiff shoulder in patients with small to large (< 5 cm) full-thickness rotator cuff tears, according to an ahead-of-print article in the May issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

Gadolinium-enhanced MRI improves diagnostic accuracy and predicts polymyalgia rheumatica
According to new research findings presented this week at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, use of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in shoulders of patients with polymyalgia rheumatica may contribute to more accurate diagnosis and prediction of recurrence.

Protective mediators can help heal injured tendon cells by attacking inflammation
Tendon tears, both to the rotator cuff and Achilles heel, are common injuries, especially in aged individuals.

Stem cell treatments for shoulder and elbow injuries flourish, but so far there's little evidence they work
Two critical reviews in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, published by Elsevier, examine the current status of biologic approaches for common shoulder and elbow problems.

Arm cuff blood pressure measurements may fall short for predicting heart disease risk in some people with resistant high blood pressure
A measurement of central blood pressure in people with difficult-to-treat high blood pressure could help reduce risk of heart disease better than traditional arm cuff readings for some patients, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.

Promising treatment for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
A New Jersey team of researchers has reported the first case of successful, long-term relief of chronic refractory shoulder pain in a wheelchair user with spinal cord injury following a single injection of autologous, micro-fragmented adipose tissue.

Timing of steroid shots before rotator cuff surgery affects infection risk
For patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff, previous steroid injections into the shoulder don't increase the risk of surgical-site infection - unless the injection is administered within one month before surgery, reports a study in the April 17, 2019, issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

High-intensity interval training increases injuries, Rutgers study finds
People who engage in high-intensity interval training are at greater risk for injury, especially in the knees and shoulders, a Rutgers study found.

Read More: Rotator Cuff News and Rotator Cuff Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.