Launch of the Lancet Asia Medical Forum

May 02, 2006

Day 1 - Wednesday, 3 May 2006
8:30 a.m. � 6:00 p.m. (Singapore time)

Day 2 - Thursday, 4 May 2006
9:00 a.m. � 5:00 p.m. (Singapore time)

Some 500 scientists, public-health experts, and policy makers will be convening at the inaugural Lancet Asia Medical Forum on pandemic influenza in Singapore tomorrow.

Close to 300 international organisations from 52 countries will be represented at the 2-day event (3-4 May).

The Forum will host talks from 23 experts in avian and pandemic influenza. Speakers include:

Professor John Oxford,
Professor of Virology at St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital, Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK

Professor Leo Yee Sin,
Clinical Director, Communicable Disease Centre, Singapore

Professor Roy M Anderson,
Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London, UK Dr Martin Meltzer,
Senior Health Economist, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA

Dr Robert G Webster,
Rose Marie Thomas Chair, Department of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA

Dr Jai P Narain,
Communicable Diseases, WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia, New Delhi, India

The sessions include:John McConnell, Editor of The Lancet Infectious Diseases, states: "The gathering of distinguished speakers and delegates in Singapore represents an unprecedented opportunity to discuss the threat of a flu pandemic and the preparations being made to manage such an event."

Press Briefings

There will be two media briefings at the Forum in the Speakers' Lounge (Room 325). These sessions will provide a unique opportunity for journalists to put questions to the experts.

Day 1 Wednesday 3 May at 6.00 p.m.
Day 2 Thursday 4 May at 1.00 p.m.

Day 1 Speakers include:

Chair: Dr Richard Horton, Editor, The Lancet

Prof John Oxford,
Professor of Virology at St Bartholomew's and the Royal London Hospital, Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK

Prof Leo Yee Sin,
Clinical Director, Communicable Disease Centre, Singapore

Prof Kennedy Shortridge,
Emeritus Professor, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China

Prof Malik Peiris,
Professor of Microbiology, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China

Dr James Campbell,
Assistant Professor of Paediatrics, University of Maryland Center for Vaccine Development, Baltimore, MD, USA

Dr Richard Coker,
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK

John McConnell,
Editor, The Lancet Infectious Diseases

Day 2 Speakers include: Chair: Dr Pam Das, Senior Editor, The Lancet Infectious Diseases

Dr David Reddy,
Tamiflu Task Force Leader, F Hoffman-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland

Dr Martin Meltzer,
Senior Health Economist, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA

Dr Robert Webster,
Rose Marie Thomas Chair, Dept of Infectious Diseases, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA

Professor Roy Anderson,
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College University of London, London, UK

John McConnell,
Editor, The Lancet Infectious Diseases

Note: Programme subject to change

The Lancet Asia Medical Forum 2006 -- Preparing for pandemic influenza: the avian dimension and other emerging threats--is jointly organised by The Lancet, Elsevier Health Sciences and Reed Exhibitions, and supported by the Singapore Ministry of Health and regional associations including Regional Emerging Diseases Intervention Centre (REDI), Asia Pacific Research Foundation for Infectious Diseases (ARFID) and the International Society of Chemotherapy (ISC).
-end-
To View The Latest Programme Visit: www.asiamedicalforum.com/programme.html

Reed Exhibitions Singapore
Ms Eileen Hor
Tel: +65 6780 4591
eileen.hor@reedexpo.com.sg

At the Forum
Dr Pamela Das,
Senior Editor, The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Tel: +44 7717 730 932

Lancet

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