Nav: Home

Gluten-free diet not recommended for people without celiac disease

May 02, 2017

Long term dietary intake of gluten among people without celiac disease is not associated with risk of coronary heart disease - and restricting gluten may result in a low intake of whole grains, which are associated with cardiovascular benefits, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

As such, the researchers say the promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.

Dietary gluten triggers inflammation and intestinal damage in people with celiac disease - and is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, which is reduced after treatment with a gluten-free diet.

But avoidance of gluten among people without celiac disease has also increased in recent years, partly owing to the belief that gluten can have harmful health effects.

Yet despite the rising trend in low gluten or gluten free diets, no long term studies have assessed the relation of dietary gluten with the risk of chronic conditions such as coronary heart disease in people without celiac disease.

So a team of US based researchers decided to examine the association of long term intake of gluten with the development of coronary heart disease.

They analysed data on 64,714 female and 45,303 male US health professionals with no history of coronary heart disease who completed a detailed food questionnaire in 1986 that was updated every four years through to 2010.

Consumption of gluten and development of coronary heart disease was monitored over this 26-year period. After adjusting for known risk factors, no significant association between estimated gluten intake and the risk of subsequent overall coronary heart disease was found.

However, further analyses suggest that restricting dietary gluten may result in a low intake of whole grains, which are associated with lower cardiovascular risk.

The authors point out that this is an observational study, so no firm conclusions can be drawn about cause and effect, and they outline some limitations that could have introduced bias.

Nevertheless, they conclude that their findings "do not support the promotion of a gluten restricted diet with a goal of reducing coronary heart disease risk."

And they warn that "promotion of gluten-free diets for the purpose of coronary heart disease prevention among asymptomatic people without celiac disease should not be recommended."
-end-


BMJ

Related Celiac Disease Articles:

Infections in early life associated with increased risk for Celiac disease
Infections during infancy are associated with increased risk for gluten intolerance (celiac disease) later on.
ImmusanT publishes positive data from Phase 1 trials of Nexvax2 in celiac disease patients
ImmusanT announces the publication of positive data from Phase 1 clinical trials of the Nexvax2 therapeutic vaccine in celiac disease patients in The Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
Gluten-free diet not recommended for people without celiac disease
Long term dietary intake of gluten among people without celiac disease is not associated with risk of coronary heart disease -- and restricting gluten may result in a low intake of whole grains, which are associated with cardiovascular benefits, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
A viral explanation for celiac disease
An asymptomatic infection may play a role in facilitating celiac disease, a new study in mice reveals.
Seemingly innocuous virus can trigger celiac disease
Infection with reovirus, a common but otherwise harmless virus, can trigger the immune system response to gluten that leads to celiac disease, according to new research from the University of Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
More Celiac Disease News and Celiac Disease Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.