Nav: Home

Gluten-free diet not recommended for people without celiac disease

May 02, 2017

Long term dietary intake of gluten among people without celiac disease is not associated with risk of coronary heart disease - and restricting gluten may result in a low intake of whole grains, which are associated with cardiovascular benefits, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

As such, the researchers say the promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.

Dietary gluten triggers inflammation and intestinal damage in people with celiac disease - and is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, which is reduced after treatment with a gluten-free diet.

But avoidance of gluten among people without celiac disease has also increased in recent years, partly owing to the belief that gluten can have harmful health effects.

Yet despite the rising trend in low gluten or gluten free diets, no long term studies have assessed the relation of dietary gluten with the risk of chronic conditions such as coronary heart disease in people without celiac disease.

So a team of US based researchers decided to examine the association of long term intake of gluten with the development of coronary heart disease.

They analysed data on 64,714 female and 45,303 male US health professionals with no history of coronary heart disease who completed a detailed food questionnaire in 1986 that was updated every four years through to 2010.

Consumption of gluten and development of coronary heart disease was monitored over this 26-year period. After adjusting for known risk factors, no significant association between estimated gluten intake and the risk of subsequent overall coronary heart disease was found.

However, further analyses suggest that restricting dietary gluten may result in a low intake of whole grains, which are associated with lower cardiovascular risk.

The authors point out that this is an observational study, so no firm conclusions can be drawn about cause and effect, and they outline some limitations that could have introduced bias.

Nevertheless, they conclude that their findings "do not support the promotion of a gluten restricted diet with a goal of reducing coronary heart disease risk."

And they warn that "promotion of gluten-free diets for the purpose of coronary heart disease prevention among asymptomatic people without celiac disease should not be recommended."
-end-


BMJ

Related Celiac Disease Articles:

How probiotic Bifidobacteria could help celiac disease patients
Gluten is enemy No. 1 for those with celiac disease, and it's hard to avoid.
Celiac disease linked to increased risk of premature death
People with celiac disease have increased risk of dying prematurely, despite increased awareness of the disease in recent years and better access to gluten-free food.
Celiac disease might be cured by restoring immune tolerance to gliadin
Celiac disease affects 0.3-2.4% of people in most countries world-wide, and approx.
New mouse model for celiac disease to speed research on treatments
Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed the first truly accurate mouse model of celiac disease.
Bacterial link in celiac disease
Researchers have discovered bacterial exposure is a potential environmental risk factor in developing celiac disease, a hereditary autoimmune-like condition that affects about one in 70 Australians.
New method enables easier and faster detection of celiac disease antibodies
Researchers from the University of Helsinki, Finland, developed a novel diagnostic method for the rapid on-site measurement of antibodies from patient samples.
New treatment may reverse celiac disease
A phase 2 clinical trial using a new technology show it is possible to induce immune tolerance to gluten in individuals with celiac disease.
A biomarker for diagnosing celiac disease in people on a gluten-free diet
Researchers at the UPV/EHU and the BioCruces-Bizkaia Institute of Healthcare Research (IIS) have recently published an article in the Human Molecular Genetics journal in which they report on the discovery of a biomarker that could enable celiac disease to be diagnosed in the blood of people on a gluten-free diet.
RNA sequencing used to discover novel genes and pathways in celiac disease
Researchers at the Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center at MassGeneral Hospital for Children have discovered novel genes and pathways related to early stages in the development of celiac disease and the ongoing inflammation and comorbidities associated with the condition.
Could this widely used food additive cause celiac disease?
A bacterial enzyme that is used to improve food texture and shelf-life has been linked in several studies to celiac disease -- but it is unlabeled and hidden from public knowledge, according to a review published in Frontiers in Pediatrics.
More Celiac Disease News and Celiac Disease Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.