Nav: Home

NASA goes infrared on powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani

May 02, 2019

NASA's Aqua satellite focused an infrared eye on a very powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani as it approached landfall in northeastern India. Fani is a powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

On May 2 at 3:29 a.m. EDT (0729 UTC), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures of Tropical Cyclone Fani in infrared light. AIRS found cloud top temperatures of strongest thunderstorms as cold as or colder than minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62 degrees Celsius) circling the eye and in a fragmented band of thunderstorms east of the center. Satellite data showed there is now a 16 nautical mile-wide round, symmetrical eye surrounded by a thick band of powerful thunderstorms. Cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms that have the capability to create heavy rain.

On May 2 at 11 a.m. EST (1500 UTC), the center of Tropical Cyclone Fani was located near latitude 17.6 degrees north and longitude 84.8 degrees east. That is about 87 miles east of Visakhapatnam, India. Fani was moving to the north and maximum sustained winds increased to 135 knots (155 mph/250 kph).

Fani is forecast to move to the north-northeast. The India Meteorological Department forecasts Fani to make landfall within 12 to 24 hours, then weaken rapidly and dissipate over northeastern India and Bangladesh.
-end-
For local forecasts, visit the India Meteorological Department: http://www.imd.gov.in/

By Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Eye Articles:

Antibody-based eye drops show promise for treating dry eye disease
Researchers have identified the presence of a specific type of antibody, called anti-citrullinated protein autoantibodies, or ACPAs, in human tear fluid.
Left eye? Right eye? American robins have preference when looking at decoy eggs
Just as humans are usually left- or right-handed, other species sometimes prefer one appendage, or eye, over the other.
The algae's third eye
Scientists at the Universities of Würzburg and Bielefeld in Germany have discovered an unusual new light sensor in green algae.
Making an eye for you
Kyoto University scientists utilize simulations and laboratory experiments to find that cells sense the mechanical forces to form the primordial eye, the optic cup.
A trained eye
UCSB researchers show that category learning can be influenced by where an object is in our field of vision.
Decrease in eye injuries to children
Eye injuries that sent children to emergency departments in the United States decreased from 2006 to 2014, and most eye injuries posed low risk for vision loss.
Increased electrical activity in eye may relieve short-term dry eye pain
A boost of electrical activity in the eye's mucous membranes may lead to new treatments for the painful condition known as dry eye.
An eye toward regeneration
UNLV scientist Kelly Tseng, Ph.D. and her team have found that frog embryos can fully regrow their eyes after injuries, a breakthrough that may lead one day to the ability to orchestrate tissue regeneration in humans.
Art is in the eye of the beholder
A researcher from James Cook University in Australia has found that a person's mental state affects how they look at art.
In the eye of the medulloblastoma
Can genes normally expressed only in the eye be activated in brain tumors?
More Eye News and Eye Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.