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How to make cut flowers last longer (video)

May 03, 2016

WASHINGTON, May 3, 2016 -- After April showers, we get May flowers -- just in time for Mother's Day. Sadly, after a few days, that wonderful bouquet may start wilting. Thankfully, Reactions has picked out the best science-backed tips to maximize the freshness of your cut flowers. Be sure to check out this video before you buy your bouquet: https://youtu.be/ZYifkcmIb-4.
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