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Can personality traits affect likelihood of using mindfulness-based stress reduction?

May 03, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, May 3, 2016--A new study of older adults, who can gain particular quality of life benefits from the use of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) techniques, showed that specific personality traits were associated with individual differences in the use of MBSR during and post-training. These findings can help better tailor MBSR programs to targeted populations, as described in an article in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website until June 3, 2016.

Tessa Barkan and Michael Hoerger, PhD, Tulane University (New Orleans, LA), Autumn Gallegos, PhD, Paul Duberstein, PhD and Jan Moynihan, PhD, University of Rochester Medical Center (NY), and Nicholas Turiano, PhD, West Virginia University (Morgantown), evaluated the relationship between five aspects of personality--neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, conscientiousness, and agreeableness--among a group of older adults and how often they used the MBSR techniques they were taught during an 8-week training program and at follow-up 6 months later.

The article, "Personality Predicts Utilization of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction During and Post-Intervention in a Community Sample of Older Adults," describes how MBSR, which combines yoga, meditation, and body scanning, may be especially helpful as a non-pharmacological approach to coping with emotional distress, loneliness, and insomnia and to improving balance and coordination.
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Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences under Award Number U54GM104940, the National Institute of Mental Health under Award Numbers R25MH074898 and T32MH018911, and the National Institute on Aging under Award Numbers R01AG025474 and R24AG031089. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

About the Journal

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine is a monthly peer-reviewed journal published online with open access options and in print. The Journal provides observational, clinical, and scientific reports and commentary intended to help healthcare professionals and scientists evaluate and integrate therapies into patient care protocols and research strategies. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Alternative and Complementary Therapies, Medical Acupuncture, and Journal of Medicinal Food. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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