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New research from Yale and MIT describes bioreactor to support whole lung regeneration

May 03, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, May 3, 2016--An innovative mechanical system that mimics the ventilation and blood flow in the chest cavity, housed in a specialized, sterile bioreactor, can support the growth of engineered whole lungs at human scale. Researchers designed this biomimetic environment to advance toward clinical application of whole lung regeneration for transplant using a patient's own cells, as described in BioResearch Open Access, a peer-reviewed open access journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available to download on the BioResearch Open Access website.

Micha Sam Brickman Raredon and coauthors, Yale University (New Haven, CT), MIT (Cambridge, MA), and Raredon Resources, Inc. (Northampton, MA), provide a detailed description of the design and construction of the novel bioreactor system that can accommodate human or pig lungs.

In the article "Biomimetic Culture Reactor for Whole Lung Engineering," the researchers present data from experiments that demonstrate the ability to keep lung tissue alive and functional and to remove the cellular material from an entire porcine lung while it is in the apparatus.

"The new bioreactor design described in this article will be of interest to those in the translational organogenesis and regenerative medicine community," says BioResearch Open Access Editor Jane Taylor, PhD, MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Scotland. "It begins to address the critical need to develop functional bioreactors suitable for clinical application,"

-end-

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health Award Number 1U01HL111016-01. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

About the Journal

BioResearch Open Access is a peer-reviewed open access journal led by Editor-in-Chief Robert Lanza, MD, Chief Scientific Officer, Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. and Editor Jane Taylor, PhD. The Journal provides a new rapid-publication forum for a broad range of scientific topics including molecular and cellular biology, tissue engineering and biomaterials, bioengineering, regenerative medicine, stem cells, gene therapy, systems biology, genetics, biochemistry, virology, microbiology, and neuroscience. All articles are published within 4 weeks of acceptance and are fully open access and posted on PubMed Central. All journal content is available on the BioResearch Open Access website.



About the Publisher


Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many areas of science and biomedical research, including DNA and Cell Biology, Tissue Engineering, Stem Cells and Development, Human Gene Therapy, HGT Methods, and HGT Clinical Development, and AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News
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