Nav: Home

Current whale migration models are too simplified

May 03, 2016

New research challenges the traditional view that baleen whales (Mysticetes) migrate between high-latitude feeding areas and low-latitude breeding areas.

Using populations of fin whales in the Mediterranean as a case study and reviewing the migratory behaviors of all baleen whales, investigators found that the seasonal behavior of Mediterranean fin whales is highly dynamic, that other populations of baleen whales show similar migratory patterns, and that the traditional model of whale migration is too simplified.

"Mysticete migration should be thought of as a continuum of different strategies that have evolved in the face of different selective pressures. A greater knowledge of ecological factors, reproductive patterns, and local adaptations is needed to understand the evolutionary mechanisms behind the diversity of migratory habits," said Dr. Christina Geijer, lead author of the Mammal Review study.
-end-


Wiley

Related Baleen Whales Articles:

Stranded whales detected from space
A new technique for analysing satellite images may help scientists detect and count stranded whales from space.
Researchers use drones to weigh whales
Researchers from Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies (AIAS) in Denmark and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US devised a way to accurately estimate the weight of free-living whales using only aerial images taken by drones.
Plastic in Britain's seals, dolphins and whales
Microplastics have been found in the guts of every marine mammal examined in a new study of animals washed up on Britain's shores.
Otago researcher contributes piece to the puzzle of baleen whales' evolution
An Otago researcher has added another piece to the puzzle of the evolution of modern baleen whales with a world-first study examining the teeth and enamel of baleen whales' ancestors.
Groups of pilot whales have their own dialects
A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has found that short-finned pilot whales living off the coast of Hawai'i have their own sorts of vocal dialects, a discovery that may help researchers understand the whales' complex social structure.
Whales lost their teeth before evolving hair-like baleen in their mouths
Rivaling the evolution of feathers in dinosaurs, one of the most extraordinary transformations in the history of life was the evolution of baleen -- rows of flexible hair-like plates that blue whales, humpbacks and other marine mammals use to filter relatively tiny prey from gulps of ocean water.
33-million-year-old whale from Oregon had neither teeth nor baleen
A study reported in Current Biology on Nov. 29 describes a 33-million-year-old fossil whale named Maiabalaena, which means 'mother whale.' The ancient whale from Oregon is especially remarkable in that it had neither teeth nor baleen.
Chinese scientists unlock structural secrets of whale baleen
Chinese scientists working with other researchers have for the first time uncovered the underlying mechanisms of the hierarchical structure of baleen, with an eye toward developing advanced engineered materials.
Humpback whales arrive in the Mediterranean to feed themselves
Although the presence of humpback whales in the Mediterranean has been considered unusual, it is known that their visits have increased in the last 150 years.
Watching whales from space
Scientists have used detailed high-resolution satellite images provided by Maxar Technologies' DigitalGlobe, to detect, count and describe four different species of whales.
More Baleen Whales News and Baleen Whales Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#541 Wayfinding
These days when we want to know where we are or how to get where we want to go, most of us will pull out a smart phone with a built-in GPS and map app. Some of us old timers might still use an old school paper map from time to time. But we didn't always used to lean so heavily on maps and technology, and in some remote places of the world some people still navigate and wayfind their way without the aid of these tools... and in some cases do better without them. This week, host Rachelle Saunders...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.