Nav: Home

Current whale migration models are too simplified

May 03, 2016

New research challenges the traditional view that baleen whales (Mysticetes) migrate between high-latitude feeding areas and low-latitude breeding areas.

Using populations of fin whales in the Mediterranean as a case study and reviewing the migratory behaviors of all baleen whales, investigators found that the seasonal behavior of Mediterranean fin whales is highly dynamic, that other populations of baleen whales show similar migratory patterns, and that the traditional model of whale migration is too simplified.

"Mysticete migration should be thought of as a continuum of different strategies that have evolved in the face of different selective pressures. A greater knowledge of ecological factors, reproductive patterns, and local adaptations is needed to understand the evolutionary mechanisms behind the diversity of migratory habits," said Dr. Christina Geijer, lead author of the Mammal Review study.
-end-


Wiley

Related Baleen Whales Articles:

Meals on the go: The physics of whales' eating habits
Saint Louis University professor of physics Jean Potvin, Ph.D., and colleagues detail for the first time how baleen whales use crossflow filtration to separate prey from water without ever coming into contact with the baleen.
Baleen whales' ancestors were toothy suction feeders
Modern whales' ancestors probably hunted and chased down prey, but somehow, those fish-eating hunters evolved into filter-feeding leviathans.
Scientists tag humpback whales in southeast Pacific
Whales from both poles migrate long distances to breed in tropical waters.
Save the whales
Benioff Ocean Initiative announces first project, commits $1.5 million to finding solutions to whale deaths caused by vessel collisions.
New, complex call recorded in Mariana Trench believed to be from baleen whale
A sound in the Mariana Trench notable for its complexity and wide frequency range likely represents the discovery of a new baleen whale call, according to the Oregon State University researchers who recorded and analyzed it.
World-first research sheds light on the origin of the baleen whale
Monash University scientists have played a key role in discovering the origin of filter feeding in baleen whales -- the largest animal known to have ever existed.
Whales in the desert
In Cerro Colorado, located in the Ica Desert of Peru, sedimentary sequences dating back nine million years have been found to host the fossil skeletons of hundreds of marine vertebrates.
Young bowhead whales may cease growing lengthwise to grow head and baleen plates
Young bowhead whales may cease growing lengthwise and undergo severe bone loss to help grow their enormous head and baleen plates, according to a study published June 22, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by John George from North Slope Borough Department of Wildlife Management, Alaska, and colleagues.
Antarctic whales and the krill they eat
The Western Antarctic sector of the Southern Ocean is the regular feeding ground of a large number of fin and humpback whales of the Southern Hemisphere.
Slow path to recovery for southern right whales
The first population assessment since the end of the whaling era reveals that New Zealand southern right whales have some way to go before numbers return to pre-industrial levels.

Related Baleen Whales Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Moving Forward
When the life you've built slips out of your grasp, you're often told it's best to move on. But is that true? Instead of forgetting the past, TED speakers describe how we can move forward with it. Guests include writers Nora McInerny and Suleika Jaouad, and human rights advocate Lindy Lou Isonhood.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...