Nav: Home

Research on modern day animals reveals insights into extinct animals

May 03, 2016

Powerful head and neck retractions of vertebrate carcasses, including dinosaur fossils, have puzzled researchers as to whether they occurred just before an animal's death in agony, or after. Now experiments performed in the wild on large ostrich chick cadavers show that they occur post-mortem.

The experiments show that the timing of soft tissue decay is critical, and that muscle destruction or loss of tone must occur before ligament destruction. This would allow for the release of stored energy in the ligament and result in vertebral retraction.

The wider implications of the study concerns one of the most controversial dinosaurs known, Sinosauropteryx , which is thought by some to have been feathered and to have died in water. "While emphasis on Sinosauropteryx has been on its alleged and highly questionable protofeathers, the present study offers considerably more constructive research on how the dinosaur died," said Prof. Theagarten Lingham-Soliar, author of the Journal of Zoology study.
-end-


Wiley

Related Death Articles:

Death by volcano?
he discovery of anomalously high levels of mercury in rocks from the Ordivician geological period has led to a new interpretation of the ensuing mass extinction.
Starvation causes atypical cell death
Researchers from IDIBELL -- within the Marie Curie ITN TRAIN-ERs -- have characterized the cell death process due to starvation, in which the endoplasmic reticulum plays a leading role.
Does death of a sibling in childhood increase risk of death in surviving children?
Bereavement in childhood due to the death of a sibling was associated with an increased risk for death in both the short and long term, according to a new article published by JAMA Pediatrics.
A kiss of death to drug the 'undruggable'
Scientists at the University of Dundee have reported a major breakthrough in targeting the causes of many diseases, using a 'kiss of death' to destroy proteins which had previously been regarded as 'undruggable.'
Overall rate of death from cancer decreases in US
The overall rate of death from cancer declined about 20 percent between 1980 and 2014; however, there are distinct clusters of counties in the US with particularly high cancer mortality rates, according to a study in the Jan.
Now entering 'the valley of death'
Amid Trump comments and stock dive, let WUSTL expert in drug research and development Michael Kinch walk you through pharma 'Valley of Death.'
An 'IRBIT'uary before cell death
Billions of cells in our bodies die every day in an important process called apoptosis.
A new light on stellar death
An international group of astronomers illuminates the role rapidly spinning black holes play in tidal disruption events.
How this Martian moon became the 'Death Star'
For the first time, physicists at LLNL have demonstrated how an asteroid or comet impact could have created Stickney crater without destroying Phobos completely.
Postmortem genetic testing may help determine cause of death after sudden unexpected death
In a study appearing in the Oct. 11 issue of JAMA, Ali Torkamani, Ph.D., of Scripps Translational Science Institute, La Jolla, Calif., and colleagues report preliminary results from a family-based, postmortem genetic testing study.

Related Death Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...