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Save the date: Acoustical Society of America (ASA) Spring Meeting 2016 in Salt Lake City May 23-27

May 04, 2016

WASHINGTON, D.C., May 4, 2016 - From the bemoaned phenomenon of vocal fry to the powerful pitch posturing of politicians in presidential pursuit, a game-changing golf club too noisy for players to embrace, the effectiveness of noise ordinances, the danger of hospital alarm fatigue, and more, a cacophony of conflicting and concordant cadences will ring out across Utah at the world's largest meeting devoted to the science of sound in Salt Lake City later this month.

The 171st Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) will be held May 23-27, 2016, at the Salt Lake Marriott Downtown at City Creek Hotel. It will feature more than 900 presentations on sound and its applications in physics, engineering, and medicine. Reporters are invited to attend in person for free (see details below).

Journalists may also remotely access meeting information with ASA's World Wide Press Room, which will go live one week before the conference begins. A live media webcast featuring a selection of newsworthy research will take place on Tuesday, May 24. Time and topics to be announced.

For descriptions of all presentations, see the ASA Spring 2016 program at: http://acousticalsociety.org/content/spring-meeting-itinerary-planner
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MORE MEETING INFORMATION

USEFUL LINKS

Main meeting website: http://acousticalsociety.org/content/spring-2016-meeting

Itinerary planner and technical program: http://acousticalsociety.org/content/spring-meeting-itinerary-planner

WORLD WIDE PRESS ROOM

In the coming weeks, ASA's World Wide Press Room will be updated with additional tips on dozens of newsworthy stories and with lay-language papers, which are 400-900 word summaries of presentations written by scientists for a general audience and accompanied by photos, audio, and video. You can visit the site, beginning in early May, at (http://acoustics.org/current-meeting).

PRESS REGISTRATION

We will grant free registration to credentialed journalists and professional freelance journalists. If you are a reporter and would like to attend, contact John Arnst (jarnst@aip.org, 301-209-3096) who can also help with setting up interviews and obtaining images, sound clips, or background information.

LIVE MEDIA WEBCAST

A press briefing featuring a selection of newsworthy research will be webcast live from the conference on Tuesday, May 24. Topics and time of webcast to be announced.

ABOUT THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA

The Acoustical Society of America (ASA) is the premier international scientific society in acoustics devoted to the science and technology of sound. Its 7,000 members worldwide represent a broad spectrum of the study of acoustics. ASA publications include The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (the world's leading journal on acoustics), Acoustics Today magazine, books, and standards on acoustics. The society also holds two major scientific meetings each year. For more information about ASA, visit our website at http://www.acousticalsociety.org.

Acoustical Society of America

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