Nav: Home

How do anesthesiologists view acupuncture and acupressure?

May 04, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, May 4, 2016 -- In a new study of anesthesia providers in the U.S., most report not having used or received any education in acupuncture or acupressure. However, the majority of those participants recognize the potential benefits of acupuncture on acute postoperative and chronic pain, and of both acupuncture and acupressure on reducing anxiety. About 75% of providers expressed interest in acupuncture/acupressure education, according to the study published in Medical Acupuncture, a peer-reviewed journal from by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Medical Acupuncture website until June 4, 2016.

The article "Perceptions of Acupuncture and Acupressure by Anesthesia Providers" reports that more than half of the providers in the study would consider using these alternative medicine techniques in their practice. Coauthors Amanda Faircloth, PhD, DNAP, CRNA, Arkadiy Dubovoy, MD, Chuck Biddle, CRNA, PhD, and John Butterworth IV, MD, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, and Diane Dodd-McCue, DBA, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Allied Health Professions (Richmond, VA), suggest that this receptiveness presents a strong argument in favor of incorporating aspects of alternative medicine into the curriculum for anesthesia education.

"Clinical trials would eventually make this information even more meaningful as to whether these modalities are useful, but the article demonstrates that anesthesiologists are willing to investigate acupuncture and acupressure for pain and anxiety in their practices," says Richard C. Niemtzow, MD, PhD, MPH, Editor-in-Chief of Medical Acupuncture and Director of the United States Air Force Acupuncture and Integrative Medicine Center, Joint Base Andrews, Maryland.
-end-
About the Journal

Medical Acupuncture , the Official Journal of the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published bimonthly in print and online. Led by Richard C. Niemtzow, MD, PhD, MPH, Director, United States Air Force Acupuncture and Integrative Medicine Center (Joint Base Andrews, MD), the Journal presents evidence-based clinical articles, case reports, and research findings that integrate concepts from traditional and modern forms of acupuncture with allopathic medicine. Tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Medical Acupuncture website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Alternative and Complementary Therapies, Journal of Women's Health, and Journal of Palliative Medicine. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Related Chronic Pain Articles:

Breastfeeding may protect against chronic pain after Caesarean section
Breastfeeding after a Caesarean section (C-section) may help manage pain, with mothers who breastfed their babies for at least two months after the operation three times less likely to experience persistent pain compared to those who breastfed for less than two months, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress in Geneva (June 3-5).
Unexpected mechanism behind chronic nerve pain
It has long been assumed that chronic nerve pain is caused by hypersensitivity in the neurons that transmit pain.
Chronic pain amplifies the brain's reaction to new injuries
Chronic pain in any one body part may distort the intensity with which a key brain region perceives pain everywhere else.
How doubts about getting better influence chronic pain treatment success
A leading psychology professor at The University of Texas at Arlington has focused international attention on how a chronic pain patient's irrational doubts about never getting better can influence both his reactions to pain and even treatment outcomes.
New study finds reading can help with chronic pain
A study conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool, The Reader and the Royal Liverpool University Hospitals Trust, and funded by the British Academy, has found that shared reading (SR) can be a useful therapy for chronic pain sufferers.
Can staying active help to prevent chronic pain? Physical activity affects pain modulation in older adults
Older adults with higher levels of physical activity have pain modulation patterns that might help lower their risk of developing chronic pain, reports a study in PAINĀ®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP).
Poor and less educated suffer the most from chronic pain
Poorer and less-educated older Americans are more like to suffer from chronic pain than those with greater wealth and more education, but the disparity between the two groups is much greater than previously thought, climbing as high as 370 percent in some categories, according to new research by a University at Buffalo medical sociologist.
New study to investigate role of sleep in chronic pain
Washington State University will lead a study to understand the relationship between sleep and chronic pain, part of a nationwide effort to address the rising abuse of opioid pain relievers and expand the arsenal of non-drug treatment options.
UK study to help chronic pain sufferers back to work
Researchers from the University of Warwick's Medical School are leading a novel study to explore ways of helping people with chronic pain back to work.
Chronic pain linked to partners of people with depression
Partners of people with depression are more likely to suffer from chronic pain, research from the University of Edinburgh has found.

Related Chronic Pain Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Setbacks
Failure can feel lonely and final. But can we learn from failure, even reframe it, to feel more like a temporary setback? This hour, TED speakers on changing a crushing defeat into a stepping stone. Guests include entrepreneur Leticia Gasca, psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood, astronomer Phil Plait, former professional athlete Charly Haversat, and UPS training manager Jon Bowers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#524 The Human Network
What does a network of humans look like and how does it work? How does information spread? How do decisions and opinions spread? What gets distorted as it moves through the network and why? This week we dig into the ins and outs of human networks with Matthew Jackson, Professor of Economics at Stanford University and author of the book "The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs, and Behaviours".