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New bone marrow-on-a-chip can model radiation therapy damage and assess preventive measures

May 04, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, May 4, 2016 -- Engineered bone marrow grown in a novel microfluidic chip device responds to damaging radiation exposure followed by treatment with compounds that aid in blood cell recovery in a way that mimics living bone marrow. This new bone marrow-on-a-chip microdevice holds promise for testing and developing improved radiation countermeasures, as described in Tissue Engineering, Part C, Methods, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free to download on the Tissue Engineering website until June 4, 2016.

Yu-suke Torisawa and coauthors from Harvard University (Boston and Cambridge, MA), Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School show that the microdevice provides a way to keep the engineered bone marrow alive and to monitor the formation of different blood cell populations long enough after radiation damage to be able to evaluate the effects of experimental drugs being developed as protective agents.

In the article "Modeling Hematopoiesis and Responses to Radiation Countermeasures in a Bone Marrow-on-a-Chip," the researchers report that unlike the microdevice, conventional static bone marrow culture methods do not mimic the recovery response of bone marrow in the body to these types of drugs.

"The development of relevant high-throughput systems is a field that will have huge impact in the near future for personalized medicine," says Methods Co-Editor-in-Chief John A. Jansen, DDS, PhD, Professor and Head Dentistry, Radboud University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
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About the Journal

Tissue Engineering is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online and in print in three parts: Part A, the flagship journal published 24 times per year; Part B: Reviews, published bimonthly, and Part C: Methods, published 12 times per year. Led by Co-Editors-In-Chief Antonios Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX, and Peter C. Johnson, MD, Principal, MedSurgPI, LLC, President and CEO, Scintellix, LLC, Raleigh, NC, the Journal brings together scientific and medical experts in the fields of biomedical engineering, material science, molecular and cellular biology, and genetic engineering. Tissue Engineering is the official journal of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS). Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed online at the Tissue Engineering website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Stem Cells and Development, Human Gene Therapy, and Advances in Wound Care. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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