Nav: Home

Greater efforts are needed to promote biopesticides

May 04, 2017

There are a number of environmental and economic reasons to promote the development and use of biological compounds as pesticides. A new analysis finds that there are fewer biopesticides registered in the European Union (EU) compared with the United States, India, Brazil, and China.

The relatively low level of biopesticide research in the EU relates to the greater complexity of EU-based biopesticide regulations compared with other countries. Differences between regions mean an uneven advancement of biopesticide technology and hence missed opportunities for improvement.

"All in all, the five regions considered include about half of the planet's human population (comprising some 3.7 billion people and a total GDP of ~ $US 52 trillion), and so improving biopesticide regulation and research can, and undoubtedly will, enhance environmentally-friendly agriculture practice and performance on a global scale," wrote the authors of the Pest Management Science study.
-end-


Wiley

Related Human Population Articles:

A new T-cell population for cancer immunotherapy
Scientists at the University of Basel in Switzerland have, for the first time, described a new T cell population that can recognize and kill tumor cells.
Scientists ID human protein essential for human cytomegalovirus replication
Scientists have demonstrated that a human protein known as valosin containing protein (VCP) is essential for replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV).
How migrations and other population dynamics could have shaped early human culture
Bursts of cultural advance are usually assumed to result from climate or biological changes.
Clownfish adapt for population survival
Identification of candidate pathways in clownfish shows they can control responses to population alterations.
Human footprint surprisingly outpaced by population and economic growth
The global impact of human activities on the natural environment is extensive, but those impacts are expanding at a slower rate than the rate of economic and population growth.
Some bacteria have lived in the human gut since before we were human
Some of the bacteria in our guts were passed down over millions of years, since before we were human, suggesting that evolution plays a larger role than previously known in people's intestinal-microbe makeup, according to a new study in the journal Science.
Vanderbilt, human vaccines project launch studies to decode human immune system
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center this month began recruiting volunteers to participate in a clinical trial aimed at decoding the human 'immunome,' the genetic underpinnings of the immune system.
Third to half of UK population lives with chronic pain
Between a third and half (43 percent) of the UK population -- roughly 28 million adults -- lives with chronic pain, finds an analysis of the available evidence, published in the online journal BMJ Open.
Cancer survivors: A growing population
New report finds more than 15.5 million Americans alive with a history of cancer in 2016, a number that is projected to reach more than 20 million by 2026.
New appreciation for human microbiome leads to greater understanding of human health
University of Oklahoma anthropologists are studying the ancient and modern human microbiome and the role it plays in human health and disease.

Related Human Population Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...