Nav: Home

Treatment seeks to address exacerbations of COPD

May 04, 2017

A new study finds that delivery of oxygen via high-flow nasal tubes may help patients who experience exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

In the 24-patient cross-over trial, short-term use of nasal high-flow cannulae at 35 L/min resulted in lower levels of retained carbon dioxide compared with standard nasal prongs, but whether this is clinically significant is uncertain.

"These findings suggest that this novel way of delivering oxygen therapy to patients with an exacerbation of COPD may result in a small reduction in carbon dioxide levels," said Prof. Richard Beasley, co-author of the Respirology study. "Further research to assess the clinical utility of nasal high-flow oxygen therapy in patients who experience exacerbations of COPD is now a priority."
-end-


Wiley

Related Copd Articles:

COPD appears to cause more severe symptoms in women
Women who develop COPD report smoking fewer cigarettes than men; and yet, women experience greater breathing impairments, are subjected to more acute exacerbations of symptoms and report lower quality of life than men with the disease, according to research presented at ATS 2019.
African-Americans with COPD appear less likely to use pulmonary rehab
African-American patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, are less likely to participate in pulmonary rehabilitation programs than white patients, even when there are programs nearby.
COPD and type 2 diabetes
COPD and type 2 diabetes are two highly prevalent global health conditions associated with high mortality and morbidity.
Number of nonsmokers with COPD on the rise
The global burden of COPD is high, and prevalence of nonsmokers with COPD has been increasing.
Flu vaccination keeps COPD patients out of the hospital
A new study published in the January issue of CHEST® establishes that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) face heightened risks of death, critical illness, and hospitalization if they develop the flu and demonstrates the beneficial effects of influenza vaccination.
Kidney disease biomarker may also be a marker for COPD
A commonly used biomarker of kidney disease may also indicate lung problems, particularly COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
COPD-associated inflammation halted in model experiment
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD for short, is believed to be the third most common cause of death worldwide.
Study: Almost 100 million adults have COPD in China
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is widespread in China with 8.6 percent of the country's adult population -- almost 100 million people -- suffering from the chronic lung disease, according to a new Tulane University study published in The Lancet.
Effective rehabilitation in COPD
By 2020, COPD will be the third most common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.
Nurses' regular use of disinfectants is associated with developing COPD
Regular use of disinfectants is linked to a higher risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to new research looking at incidence of the disease in over 55,000 nurses in the USA, to be presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.
More Copd News and Copd Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#542 Climate Doomsday
Have you heard? Climate change. We did it. And it's bad. It's going to be worse. We are already suffering the effects of it in many ways. How should we TALK about the dangers we are facing, though? Should we get people good and scared? Or give them hope? Or both? Host Bethany Brookshire talks with David Wallace-Wells and Sheril Kirschenbaum to find out. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News. Related links: Why Climate Disasters Might Not Boost Public Engagement on Climate Change on The New York Times by Andrew Revkin The other kind...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab