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Treatment seeks to address exacerbations of COPD

May 04, 2017

A new study finds that delivery of oxygen via high-flow nasal tubes may help patients who experience exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

In the 24-patient cross-over trial, short-term use of nasal high-flow cannulae at 35 L/min resulted in lower levels of retained carbon dioxide compared with standard nasal prongs, but whether this is clinically significant is uncertain.

"These findings suggest that this novel way of delivering oxygen therapy to patients with an exacerbation of COPD may result in a small reduction in carbon dioxide levels," said Prof. Richard Beasley, co-author of the Respirology study. "Further research to assess the clinical utility of nasal high-flow oxygen therapy in patients who experience exacerbations of COPD is now a priority."
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Wiley

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