Nav: Home

Optical spectroscopy improves predictive assessment of kidney function

May 04, 2017

BELLINGHAM, Washington, USA , and CARDIFF, UK -- A new technique developed by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab promises to improve accuracy and lower costs of real-time assessment of kidney function, reports an article published this week by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, in the Journal of Biomedical Optics.

The paper, published 3 May and accessible via open access, explores the use of multimodal autofluorescence and light scattering to evaluate functional changes in the kidneys after ischemic injury. Conditions including accumulated arterial plaque or blood clots restrict the flow of oxygen and glucose to organs, and prolonged periods of such ischemia can compromise function.

In "Predictive assessment of kidney functional recovery following ischemic injury using optical spectroscopy," the authors report on their evaluation of various optical signatures to predict kidney viability and suggest a noncontact approach to provide clinically useful information in real time.

While other current work in this area uses expensive multiphoton and laser-based techniques, the authors reduced expenses by switching to camera-based imaging.

Currently, there is no real-time tool to measure the degree of ischemic injury incurred in tissue or to predict the return of its function. The inability to decisively determine tissue functional status runs two great risks: that dysfunctional tissue may be transplanted, increasing the morbidity and mortality of the patient; and that much-needed functional kidney tissue may be discarded.

In their study, Rajesh Raman of Lawrence Livermore National Lab and co-authors Christopher Pivetti and Christoph Troppmann of the University of California Davis, Rajendra Ramsamooj of California Northstate University, and Stavros Demos of Lawrence Livermore acquired autofluorescence images of kidneys in vivo under 355, 325, and 266 nm illumination. Light-scattering images were collected at the excitation wavelengths while using a relatively narrow band light centered at 500 nm.

The images were simultaneously recorded using a multimodal optical imaging system. The recorded signals were then analyzed to obtain time constants, which were correlated to kidney dysfunction as determined by a subsequent survival study and histopathological analysis.

Analysis of the light-scattering and autofluorescence images suggests that variations in tissue microstructure, fluorophore emission, and blood absorption spectral characteristics, combined with vascular response, contribute to the behavior of the recorded signals. These are used to obtain tissue functional information and enable the ability to predict post-transplant kidney function.

This information can also be applied to the prediction of kidney failure when visual observation cannot, almost immediately following an injury.

Reviewers of the study suggested other promising applications for future development, and envisioned this approach being used as a screening tool for assessing kidney viability prior to transplant. In particular, they said, these cost-effective screening methods could benefit healthcare in developing countries.

Multimodal imaging also has provided insights into other physiological events that may occur during ischemia and reperfusion.

"This work's exceptional value lies in the realization of a workable practical system that has excellent potential to be adopted in field situations," said journal associate editor Andreas Mandelis (University of Toronto).
-end-
Lihong Wang, Bren Professor of Medical Engineering and Electrical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology, is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Biomedical Optics. The journal is published in print and digitally in the SPIE Digital Library, which contains more than 458,000 articles from SPIE journals, proceedings, and books, with approximately 18,000 new research papers added each year.

About SPIE

SPIE is the international society for optics and photonics, an educational not-for-profit organization founded in 1955 to advance light-based science, engineering, and technology. The Society serves nearly 264,000 constituents from approximately 166 countries, offering conferences and their published proceedings, continuing education, books, journals, and the SPIE Digital Library. In 2016, SPIE provided $4 million in support of education and outreach programs. http://www.spie.org

SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics

Related Kidney Function Articles:

Study compares different measures of body fat for predicting kidney function decline
In a new study, a higher amount of body fat was linked with an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease.
Optical spectroscopy improves predictive assessment of kidney function
A new optical spectroscopy technique developed by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab promises to improve accuracy and lower costs of real-time assessment of kidney function, reports an article published this week in the Journal of Biomedical Optics.
Peptide targeting senescent cells restores stamina, fur, and kidney function in old mice
Regular infusions of a peptide that can selectively seek out and destroy broken-down cells that hamper proper tissue renewal, called senescent cells, showed evidence of improving healthspan in naturally aged mice and mice genetically engineered to rapidly age.
Researchers develop device that emulates human kidney function
Instead of running tests on live kidneys, researchers at Binghamton, University State University of New York have developed a model kidney for working out the kinks in medicines and treatments.
Kidney function in stroke patients associated with short-term outcomes
A routine blood test that measures kidney function can be a valuable predictor of short-term outcomes for stroke patients, according to a study led by a neurologist at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.
Low levels of circulating protein linked to kidney function decline
Decreased blood levels of a protein called soluble klothos were linked with an increased likelihood of experiencing kidney function decline in a group elderly well-functioning adults.
Smoking while pregnant may compromise children's kidney function
Compared with those born from nonsmoking mothers, young children whose mothers smoked while pregnant were 1.24 times more likely to show signs of kidney damage.
Diet and exercise can improve kidney function in patients with fatty liver disease
Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a potentially serious liver condition characterized by excess fat in the liver associated with inflammation and scarring.
Short and poor quality sleep may have negative effects on kidney function
In a study of patients with chronic kidney disease, each additional hour of nighttime sleep was linked with a 19 percent lower risk of developing kidney failure.
Reflux and ulcer medications linked to kidney stones and chronic kidney disease
Individuals who took proton pump inhibitors or histamine receptor-2 blockers for heartburn, acid reflux, or ulcers had elevated risks of developing kidney stones.

Related Kidney Function Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".