Nav: Home

Study shows biocell collagen ingestion reduced signs of UVB-induced photoaging

May 04, 2020

Building on an extensive body of research on the efficacy of BioCell Collagen®, a new published laboratory study finds that daily supplementation with the branded matrix reduced common signs of UVB-induced photoaging compared to the group that did not receive the supplement. The study found that oral supplementation with BioCell Collagen, with controlled UVB exposure, resulted in reduced signs of photoaging, including significant decreases in wrinkles and transepidermal water loss, and significant increases in skin elasticity and hyaluronic acid (HA) content. The full findings of the peer-reviewed study were published in the May issue of Journal of Functional Foods and are available to view on

"Nearly everyone is exposed to UVB-induced photoaging at some level and minimal research exists on options for reducing it through nutritional supplementation," said Brooke Alpert, RD and a leading skin nutrition expert. "This laboratory research study, along with prior studies in humans demonstrates that BioCell Collagen's unique matrix of hydrolyzed collagen type II peptides, chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid may be used to address common, visible signs of photoaging, and is a promising step forward. These findings are incredibly encouraging for anyone desiring healthier-looking skin, especially for those seeking an effective, safe, non-invasive option for their skin routine."

BioCell Collagen is a clinically tested branded dietary ingredient with nearly two decades of research, that promotes youthful-looking skin, active joints, and healthy connective tissues.

Conducted by an independent research team, the study evaluated the use of BioCell Collagen in hairless mice, which have skin absorption levels comparable to human skin.

There were 40 hairless mice in the study, equally divided into four groups: a group receiving no UVB exposure and no supplement, a group receiving UVB exposure with no supplement; and two active groups receiving UVB and different dosages of the supplement.

Over the course of 14 weeks, the intervention groups supplemented once daily with BioCell Collagen at 200 mg/kg (human equivalence to 1g daily) or 600 mg/kg (human equivalence to 3g daily). For UV exposure, each animal was exposed to UVB radiation (290-320 nm) three times per week. The skin was measured and graded to determine the efficacy of BioCell Collagen on measurements of wrinkles, transepidermal water loss, skin elasticity and collagen levels.

BioCell Collagen significantly impacted skin-related changes commonly associated with UVB-induced photoaging (compared with non-supplemented controls), with supplementation found to reduce the negative effects of UVB on:
  • The formation of wrinkles, including the number, area, length, and depth of wrinkles
  • Skin elasticity
  • Skin hyaluronic acid content
  • Two things commonly attributed to UVB-induced skin aging: transepidermal water loss and matrix metalloproteinases enzyme content.

These findings follow numerous published studies on the efficacy of BioCell Collagen and show how the dietary supplement is a safe and effective option for healthy skin and joint aging. Once-daily administration over 14 weeks was well-tolerated, with no reported side effects.

"These findings are consistent with prior research on the efficacy of BioCell Collagen as a safe and effective component to a skin health routine," said Suhail Ishaq, president of BioCell Technology which sponsored the study. "Photoaging effects nearly everyone and is responsible for a vast majority of visible skin damage. While BioCell Collagen cannot replace your sunscreen, this study is further evidence that BioCell Collagen can serve as a safe, easy-to-take, non-invasive addition to a skin care regimen. Pairing daily oral supplementation of BioCell Collagen with a quality topical sunscreen to prevent damage can be the foundation of a good year-round skin care routine."

Alpert points to BioCell as an accessible solution for Americans who are facing both new and seasonal changes to their usual grooming and skincare routines.

"As we head deeper into spring and toward summer, the UVB-rays that cause photoaging will again become a challenge for our skin health making the use of a quality topical sunscreen imperative," said Alpert. "Even as we stay inside, practicing social distancing, we are faced with additional skin stressors, including dryness due to HVAC systems and issues related to increased screen time. This is a viable time for those seeking more subtle ways to support their skin health to introduce BioCell Collagen supplementation into a skin care regimen, along with a topical sunscreen."

"When seeking skin health solutions, look for products supported by research," said Alpert. "The unique bioavailable matrix of BioCell Collagen is conducive to good absorption in the body, which means that you can actually get the benefits shown by research."
-end-
BioCell Collagen is available as a stand-alone product or as a primary ingredient in many formulations worldwide from leading dietary supplement brands.

About BioCell Collagen

BioCell Collagen® is a clinically studied dietary supplement ingredient comprised of a complex matrix of primarily collagen type II peptides, chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid. BioCell Collagen is clinically shown to promote active joints, youthful-looking skin, and healthy connective tissues. Various studies including seven human clinical trials support the safety, efficacy and bioavailability of BioCell Collagen. BioCell Collagen is self-affirmed GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe), is non-GMO and free of gluten, soy, shellfish, fish, egg, milk, peanuts and sugar. BioCell Collagen is only made in the USA and Germany. For more information, visit
http://www.BioCellCollagen.com

BioCell Technology

Related Hyaluronic Acid Articles:

Control of the fatty acid synthase
Max Planck researchers discover first protein that regulates fatty acid synthase
Alzheimer's: Can an amino acid help to restore memories?
Scientists at the Laboratoire des Maladies Neurodégénératives (CNRS/CEA/Université Paris-Saclay) and the Neurocentre Magendie (INSERM/Université de Bordeaux) have just shown that a metabolic pathway plays a determining role in Alzheimer's disease's memory problems.
New study indicates amino acid may be useful in treating ALS
A naturally occurring amino acid is gaining attention as a possible treatment for ALS following a new study published in the Journal of Neuropathology & Experimental Neurology.
Acid reflux affects nearly a third of US adults weekly
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a digestive disorder that causes hearburn and other uncomfortable symptoms, may affect nearly a third of US adults each week, and most of those who take certain popular medications for it still have symptoms, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study.
How plants synthesize salicylic acid
The pain-relieving effect of salicylic acid has been known for thousands of years.
Does weight loss surgery help relieve acid reflux?
Individuals who are obese often experience heartburn and other symptoms of acid reflux.
Nitric acid and ammonia electrosynthesis
The commercial synthesis methods for HNO3 and NH3 chemicals is Ostwald and Haber-Bosch process, respectively, but both of them are energy-intensive and high-emission.
Turning a porous material's color on and off with acid
Stable, color-changing compound shows potential for electronics, sensors and gas storage.
Erucic acid
Erucic acid occurs in vegetable oils and fats. It is a natural component of plant seeds of the Brassicaceae family (crucifers such as rape and mustard).
Light-induced modification of a carboxylic acid with an aminocyclopropenone
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in The Journal of Organic Chemistry that carboxylic acids, functional groups contained in biomolecules, drugs, and materials can be readily modified by light-induced organic reactions using an aminocyclopropenone.
More Hyaluronic Acid News and Hyaluronic Acid Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Biology Of Sex
Original broadcast date: May 8, 2020. Many of us were taught biological sex is a question of female or male, XX or XY ... but it's far more complicated. This hour, TED speakers explore what determines our sex. Guests on the show include artist Emily Quinn, journalist Molly Webster, neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi, and structural biologist Karissa Sanbonmatsu.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#569 Facing Fear
What do you fear? I mean really fear? Well, ok, maybe right now that's tough. We're living in a new age and definition of fear. But what do we do about it? Eva Holland has faced her fears, including trauma and phobia. She lived to tell the tale and write a book: "Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.