Professor publishes book on historic 'mosquito wars'

May 05, 2004

Dr. Gordon Patterson, Florida Tech professor of humanities and communication, is author of the just-published "The Mosquito Wars: A History of Mosquito Control in Florida. University Press of Florida published the book as part of its Florida History and Culture series.

Amazon.com describes the book: The Mosquito Wars presents a comprehensive and insightful analysis of the development of human efforts to wage war on mosquitoes in 20th-century Florida. Drawing on archival records, interviews, and published records, Gordon Patterson provides readers with a context for understanding how mosquito control has shaped the environment of contemporary Florida.

Patterson, on the Florida Tech faculty since 1981, is director of the university's Center for Florida Studies. He is also the author of "Florida Institute of Technology," a pictorial history. Patterson's research interests include modern European intellectual history and Florida history, including the work and life of Zora Neale Hurston.

Patterson is a past chair of the social science section of the Florida Academy of Science, a former director of the Florida Historical Society and a past Florida Defenders of the Environment Board of Advisors member.
-end-


Florida Institute of Technology

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