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Immune cell subset is associated with development of gastrointestinal GVHD after HSCT

May 05, 2016

Gastrointestinal graft vs. host disease (GI-GVHD) is a life threatening complication that can occur after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, a procedure that is commonly used to treat patients with leukemia. There is currently no way to predict which patients will develop GI-GVHD before the presentation of clinical symptoms. Unfortunately, the symptoms of GI-GVHD are not very specific and many patients undergo treatment for GI-GVHD in the absence of a confirmed diagnosis because the disease is so dangerous. In this issue of JCI Insight, researchers led by Sophie Paczesny of Indiana University School of Medicine report the identification of a subset of immune cells that express the protein CD146 and are increased in patients that went on to develop GI-GVHD prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. Paczesny and colleagues demonstrated that mice lacking CD146-expressing T cells had improved survival following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. These findings indicate that the CD146-expressing cell subset could potentially be used as a marker to identify patients who are likely to develop GI-GVHD after hematopoietic cell transplantation.
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TITLE: Proteomics analysis reveals a Th17-prone cell population in pre-symptomatic graft-versus-host disease

AUTHOR CONTACT:

Sophie Paczesny
Email: sophpacz@iu.edu

View this article at:http://insight.jci.org/articles/view/86660?key=dd94b111fc79acd87ea9

JCI Insight is the newest publication from the American Society of Clinical Investigation, a nonprofit honor organization of physician-scientists. JCI Insight is dedicated to publishing a range of translational biomedical research with an emphasis on rigorous experimental methods and data reporting. All articles published in JCI Insight are freely available at the time of publication. For more information about JCI Insight and all of the latest articles go to http://www.insight.jci.org.

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