Nav: Home

Managing architectural distortion on mammography based on MR enhancement

May 05, 2019

Leesburg, VA, May 5, 2019--High negative predictive values (NPV) in mammography architectural distortion (AD) without ultrasonographic (US) correlate or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancement suggests follow-up rather than biopsy may be safely performed, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, set for May 5-10 in Honolulu, HI.

Management of MG-detected AD varies among practices when tomosynthesis-guided biopsy is not available. The study was conducted to evaluate outcomes of architectural distortion on mammography (MG) with or without a magnetic resonance (MR) correlate.

Unexplained AD on MG cases with subsequent MR were retrospectively reviewed by MG type, biopsy type and cancer results, cancer type, tumor grade, and receptor status. Among the study group of 57 patients, the NPV of MG AD without MR correlate or enhancement was 97.2%. Forty-four of 57 had MG AD without US correlate. Of 12 patients without US but with MR correlate, cancers (25%) were masses on MR, majority of benign findings (58.3%) were nonmass enhancement (NME), and RS/CSL (41.7%) was mass or NME. No MG AD without US or MR correlate was found to be cancer. The NPV of MG AD without US or MR correlate or enhancement was 100%.

The results indicate that follow-up rather than biopsy may be safely performed in cases of MG AD without US and MRI correlate or enhancement, reducing the need for intervention and lowering healthcare costs.

"With 3D tomosynthesis widely incorporated in many practices, MG AD without US or MRI correlate poses a management dilemma to radiologists," author of the study Vandana Dialani, MD said. "This study is especially important for institutions which do not have tomo-guided biopsy capabilities and may revert to contrast imaging as a next step in managing MG AD. Our study shows that the NPV of MG AD without US correlate or MR enhancement was 100% and follow-up rather than biopsy may be considered."
-end-
With educational activities representing the entire spectrum of radiology, ARRS will host leading radiologists from around the world at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, May 5-10, at the Hawaii Convention Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. For more information, visit: http://www.arrs.org/am19.

American Roentgen Ray Society

Related Cancer Articles:

Stress in cervical cancer patients associated with higher risk of cancer-specific mortality
Psychological stress was associated with a higher risk of cancer-specific mortality in women diagnosed with cervical cancer.
Cancer-sniffing dogs 97% accurate in identifying lung cancer, according to study in JAOA
The next step will be to further fractionate the samples based on chemical and physical properties, presenting them back to the dogs until the specific biomarkers for each cancer are identified.
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.
More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made.
New cancer vaccine platform a potential tool for efficacious targeted cancer therapy
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have discovered a solution in the form of a cancer vaccine platform for improving the efficacy of oncolytic viruses used in cancer treatment.
American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan.
Oncotarget: Cancer pioneer employs physics to approach cancer in last research article
In the cover article of Tuesday's issue of Oncotarget, James Frost, MD, PhD, Kenneth Pienta, MD, and the late Donald Coffey, Ph.D., use a theory of physical and biophysical symmetry to derive a new conceptualization of cancer.
Health indicators for newborns of breast cancer survivors may vary by cancer type
In a study published in the International Journal of Cancer, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed health indicators for children born to young breast cancer survivors in North Carolina.
Few women with history of breast cancer and ovarian cancer take a recommended genetic test
More than 80 percent of women living with a history of breast or ovarian cancer at high-risk of having a gene mutation have never taken the test that can detect it.
Radiotherapy for invasive breast cancer increases the risk of second primary lung cancer
East Asian female breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy have a higher risk of developing second primary lung cancer.
More Cancer News and Cancer Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#542 Climate Doomsday
Have you heard? Climate change. We did it. And it's bad. It's going to be worse. We are already suffering the effects of it in many ways. How should we TALK about the dangers we are facing, though? Should we get people good and scared? Or give them hope? Or both? Host Bethany Brookshire talks with David Wallace-Wells and Sheril Kirschenbaum to find out. This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News. Related links: Why Climate Disasters Might Not Boost Public Engagement on Climate Change on The New York Times by Andrew Revkin The other kind...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab