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40 years of A Piece of My Mind essays

May 05, 2020

Bottom Line: JAMA is commemorating 40 years of publishing A Piece of My Mind essays with this theme issue of 40 favorite essays from the past 10 years. The essays are often personal vignettes in which physicians discuss the human side of medicine. This editorial highlights some of the topics in the essays. More than 1,300 essays have been published over 40 years.
-end-
Authors: Preeti Malani, M.D., M.S.J., of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and an associate JAMA editor, is the corresponding author.

 To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

Media advisory: The full editorial is linked to this news release.

(doi:10.1001/jama.2020.3760)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

JAMA

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