Nav: Home

Unraveling one of prion disease's deadly secrets

May 05, 2020

AMHERST, Mass. - A molecular biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who has for decades studied the nightmarish group of fatal diseases caused by prions - chronic wasting disease in deer, mad cow in cattle and its human analog - credits a middle-of-the-night dream for a crucial insight, a breakthrough she hopes could lead to a cure.

In a new paper in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology by Tricia Serio, dean of the College of Natural Sciences and professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at UMass Amherst, and others, report an unanticipated role for prion nucleation seeds that enhances their ability to appear and resist curing. Nucleation seeds are molecule clusters that form when prions attach to one another and change shape. "Once that change occurs, it creates a very stable aggregate known as amyloid that was thought to be impossible to inactivate by normal means," Serio notes.

The infectious prion is an unusual pathogen, a protein without nucleic acid, she explains. Prion diseases were first described in the 1800s, and include scrapie in sheep and other neurodegenerative diseases such as mad cow disease and in humans, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia and kuru from ritual cannibalism in Papua, New Guinea.

Serio says, "These diseases are always fatal," but she and colleagues including first author Janice Villali work with natural yeast prions that can't be transmitted to humans or cause disease. "It's a good model system that is not infectious, and it grows really fast."

It has been known for decades that prion protein (PrP) misfolding is a key part of the disease process, she adds. In these diseases, proteins fold into 3D shapes that cause disease. In mammals, the protein quality control system responds to folding mistakes with "chaperone" molecules that seek out misfolds and try to refold and correct mistakes.

But prions misfold so quickly that chaperones can't keep up, Serio says. "That part was known," she adds, but scientists still could not figure out what was limiting the chaperone system, allowing prions to persist. "One key factor controlling the transition from harmless protein to invincible disease menace was so hidden and obscure that it had not been previously proposed," she says.

Then, after a conference where she had talked intensely all day about prions, Serio had the crucial dream. "It came to me that the size of the aggregate nucleation seed mattered," she recalls. "So we went back and designed experiments to test the minimum size idea by mathematical modeling with co-first author Jason Dark, and it worked. That led to this investigation and why we're really excited about this paper."

The first revelation was a surprise, Serio recalls - prion aggregates come in different sizes. "Everybody knew of the nucleation seed, but no one knew they could be different sizes for the same protein." As prion proteins physically attach and the complex switches from one state to another, this minimum size is really important - but why?

It turns out, Serio says, that the seed complex must double in size for the disease to persist. It it starts with four molecules, it must reach eight. "This minimum size determines whether the chaperone can win. Four has to get to eight, but if you catch it early enough, if you pull out one side of the square, the amyloid structure can't double. Chaperones prevent the disease by preventing it from doubling in that first round."

Another discovery is that if the minimum nucleation seed starting size is 10 and it must reach 20 to create two amyloids, that complex is an easier problem for chaperones to nip, Serio points out. "In yeast, the bigger the initial seed, the more difficult it is for the disease to resist chaperones and take hold because these protein quality controls have more time to act; the smaller seed is harder to cure because it doubles more quickly."

She adds, "We realized that if we could control this transformation, we could stop the disease from arising, but we also realized that the same barrier would control going backwards and unfolding an established amyloid. The literature says that's a silly idea because prions survive and resist killing so well. But once we figured out this minimum size, we showed that it could also predict the frequency of prion curing under different growth conditions. Looking back, we can't figure out how we missed it."

Serio says she and her team now know there are at least three nucleation sizes possible, and, "I suspect that it will turn out to be an infinite number," she adds. "In fact, we have shown that we can shift the nucleation size by changing the shape of the prion or by expressing a mutant form of the protein, opening the door to therapeutic intervention to reverse this process."
-end-
In addition to colleagues at UMass Amherst, her co-authors include applied mathematician and long-time collaborator Suzanne Sindi at the University of California, Merced, and others at the University of Arizona. Funding was from NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences, with support from the biophysical characterization core at UMass Amherst's Institute of Applied Life Sciences.

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Related Protein Articles:

Memory protein
When UC Santa Barbara materials scientist Omar Saleh and graduate student Ian Morgan sought to understand the mechanical behaviors of disordered proteins in the lab, they expected that after being stretched, one particular model protein would snap back instantaneously, like a rubber band.
Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, linked to lower risk of death
Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, are associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, finds an analysis of the latest evidence published by The BMJ today.
A new understanding of protein movement
A team of UD engineers has uncovered the role of surface diffusion in protein transport, which could aid biopharmaceutical processing.
A new biotinylation enzyme for analyzing protein-protein interactions
Proteins play roles by interacting with various other proteins. Therefore, interaction analysis is an indispensable technique for studying the function of proteins.
Substituting the next-best protein
Children born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a mutation in the X-chromosome gene that would normally code for dystrophin, a protein that provides structural integrity to skeletal muscles.
A direct protein-to-protein binding couples cell survival to cell proliferation
The regulators of apoptosis watch over cell replication and the decision to enter the cell cycle.
A protein that controls inflammation
A study by the research team of Prof. Geert van Loo (VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) has unraveled a critical molecular mechanism behind autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, and psoriasis.
Resurrecting ancient protein partners reveals origin of protein regulation
After reconstructing the ancient forms of two cellular proteins, scientists discovered the earliest known instance of a complex form of protein regulation.
Sensing protein wellbeing
The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health.
Protein injections in medicine
One day, medical compounds could be introduced into cells with the help of bacterial toxins.
More Protein News and Protein Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Warped Reality
False information on the internet makes it harder and harder to know what's true, and the consequences have been devastating. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around technology and deception. Guests include law professor Danielle Citron, journalist Andrew Marantz, and computer scientist Joy Buolamwini.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.