CAD acts as 'intelligent colleague' in detecting polyps in the colon

May 06, 2004

A new computer-aided detection (CAD) system is proving that two is better than one in detecting polyps in the colon, a new study shows.

The study included 20 CT colonography data sets. Ten were normal and the other 10 included 11 polyps 5-12 mm in size, said Hiro Yoshida, PhD, assistant professor of radiology at the University of Chicago. Four readers (two attending radiologists, a radiology resident and a gastroenterologist) reviewed the data sets without the CAD system; they reviewed them again with CAD, Dr. Yoshida said. The CAD system shows physicians the possible location of suspicious polyps in an effort to significantly increase their detection performance, he said.

Human observers missed 42% of the polyps without CAD; 75% of the missed polyps were later identified by the human observers with the help of the CAD system, Dr. Yoshida said. The CAD system was actually able to detect all of the polyps missed by the readers; however, the readers "disagreed" with the computer's assessment. Dr. Yoshida noted that the low 42% figure for human observers is due in part to the fact that "we selected very difficult cases to read and we only provided the reader with one view of the colon."

There are areas where the computer is wrong, said Dr. Yoshida. "However, our study found that 77% of the computer's false positives were easily (and appropriately) dismissed by the human readers," he said.

"It is very difficult and time consuming to read and interpret CT colonography examinations," said Dr. Yoshida. The time and the difficulty of the doing and interpreting the examination could be a barrier to more widespread colon cancer screening. "CAD has the potential to play an important role in massive screening," he said.

The CAD system is currently being developed at the University of Chicago. It is not widely available at this time. However, it has been licensed to two companies, R2 Technology, Inc and Median Technologies, and thus will be available widely at the end of the year, Dr. Yoshida said.

The study will be presented on May 6 during the American Roentgen Ray Society Annual Meeting in Miami Beach, FL.
-end-
Additional Contact:
Keri J. Sperry 703-858-4306/703-919-8536
Jason Ocker 703-858-4304
Press Room

American College of Radiology

Related Radiology Articles from Brightsurf:

Data science pathway prepares radiology residents for machine learning
A recently developed data science pathway for fourth-year radiology residents will help prepare the next generation of radiologists to lead the way into the era of artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI-ML), according to a special report.

Radiology research funding has increased -- still no association with citation rate
According to ARRS' AJR, almost half of the research articles published in AJR, Radiology, and European Radiology declared funding -- a proportion that has increased from 17% of articles in 1994 and 26.9% published between 2001 and 2010.

Unread second-opinion radiology reports waste health care resources
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), 537 of 4,696 second-opinion reports--11.4%, likely underestimated, too--were not read by a clinician.

Radiology practices struggle to survive amid COVID-19
Private radiology practices have been especially hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the steps they take to mitigate the impact of the pandemic on their practice will shape the future of radiology, according to a special report from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) COVID-19 Task Force.

Social media and radiology -- The good, the bad, and the ugly
Radiologists examine social media and report #SoMe can be useful in education, research, mentoring and career development.

Experts stress radiology preparedness for COVID-19
Today, the journal Radiology published the policies and recommendations of a panel of experts on radiology preparedness during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) public health crisis.

Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging publishes special report on vaping
Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging has published a special report on lung injury resulting from the use of electronic cigarettes, or 'vaping.' Researchers aim to raise awareness among radiologists and other medical professionals on how to identify e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury.

Radiology organizations publish statement on ethics of AI in Radiology
Experts in the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology, from many of the world's leading radiology, medical physics and imaging informatics groups, today published an aspirational statement to guide the development of AI in radiology.

Rate of radiology resident recognition of non-accidental trauma
Radiology residency programs nationwide are not adequately teaching residents to accurately recognize and report child abuse, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, set for May 5-10 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Radiology publishes roadmap for AI in medical imaging
In August 2018, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., to explore the future of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging.

Read More: Radiology News and Radiology Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.