Demand for US hospital inpatient, intensive care unit beds for patients with COVID-19

May 06, 2020

What The Study Did: The intensive care unit and inpatient bed needs for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in two cities in China are described and compared to estimate the peak number of intensive care unit beds needed in U.S. cities if an outbreak equivalent to that in Wuhan occurs.

Authors: Ruoran Li, M.Phil., of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.8297)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

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