Nav: Home

Aspirin before at-home colorectal cancer screening test didn't significantly improve ability to detect cancer precursors

May 07, 2019

Bottom Line: Some observational studies have suggested that taking aspirin before undergoing colorectal cancer screening with a fecal immunochemical test for blood in stool might improve the ability of the test to detect cancer precursors. This randomized clinical trial included about 1,200 adults (between the ages of 40 and 80) who took a single dose of aspirin (300 mg) two days before collecting a stool sample for a fecal immunochemical test and about 1,200 adults who took a placebo. Researchers report a higher detection rate in the aspirin group but the difference between the two groups wasn't statistically significant. A limitation of the study is that the results were based on relatively few individuals who had cancer precursors.

Authors: Hermann Brenner, M.D., M.P.H., German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jama.2019.4755)
-end-
Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article: This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2732573?guestAccessKey=4603433e-571d-4e10-9155-6e0c558fbecc&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=050719

JAMA

Related Aspirin Articles:

What are the risks and benefits of low-dose aspirin?
Low-dose aspirin significantly lowers cardiovascular disease risk but increases the risk of bleeding, according to a review published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.
Benefit seen for ticagrelor alone, without aspirin, in patients with ACS
The research was presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Study: An aspirin a day does not keep dementia at bay
Taking a low-dose aspirin once a day does not reduce the risk of thinking and memory problems caused by mild cognitive impairment or probable Alzheimer's disease, nor does it slow the rate of cognitive decline, according to a large study published in the March 25, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Aspirin's health benefits under scrutiny
Taking a baby aspirin every day to prevent a heart attack or stroke should no longer be recommended to patients who haven't already experienced one of these events.
Aspirin may no longer be effective as cardiovascular treatment
A new paper in Family Practice, published by Oxford University Press, found that the widespread use of statins and cancer screening technology may have altered the benefits of aspirin use.
Migraine headaches? Consider aspirin for treatment and prevention
Evidence from 13 randomized trials of the treatment of migraine in 4,222 patients and tens of thousands of patients in prevention of recurrent attacks supports the use of high dose aspirin from 900 to 1,300 milligrams to treat acute migraine as well as low dose daily aspirin from 81 to 325 milligrams to prevent recurrent attacks.
Aspirin use after biliary tract cancer diagnosis
Researchers in this observational study examined if aspirin use after a diagnosis of a biliary tract cancer, which includes gallbladder cancer, was associated with reduced risk of death among nearly 3,000 patients.
Aspirin may prevent air pollution harms
A new study is the first to report evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin may lessen the adverse effects of air pollution exposure on lung function.
Aspirin should not be recommended for healthy people over 70
Low-dose aspirin does not prolong disability-free survival of healthy people over 70, even in those at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease.
Frequent use of aspirin can lead to increased bleeding
A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has found that taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attacks and strokes, can lead to an increase risk of almost 50 percent in major bleeding episodes.
More Aspirin News and Aspirin Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Making Amends
What makes a true apology? What does it mean to make amends for past mistakes? This hour, TED speakers explore how repairing the wrongs of the past is the first step toward healing for the future. Guests include historian and preservationist Brent Leggs, law professor Martha Minow, librarian Dawn Wacek, and playwright V (formerly Eve Ensler).
Now Playing: Science for the People

#566 Is Your Gut Leaking?
This week we're busting the human gut wide open with Dr. Alessio Fasano from the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital. Join host Anika Hazra for our discussion separating fact from fiction on the controversial topic of leaky gut syndrome. We cover everything from what causes a leaky gut to interpreting the results of a gut microbiome test! Related links: Center for Celiac Research and Treatment website and their YouTube channel
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Flag and the Fury
How do you actually make change in the world? For 126 years, Mississippi has had the Confederate battle flag on their state flag, and they were the last state in the nation where that emblem remained "officially" flying.  A few days ago, that flag came down. A few days before that, it coming down would have seemed impossible. We dive into the story behind this de-flagging: a journey involving a clash of histories, designs, families, and even cheerleading. This show is a collaboration with OSM Audio. Kiese Laymon's memoir Heavy is here. And the Hospitality Flag webpage is here.