Nav: Home

Mouthwash as smoking deterrent? UB dental researchers to test new product for safety, efficacy

May 08, 2000

Smokers who want to quit but really enjoy the taste of a cigarette may soon have a new weapon at their disposal. And if it works, it would be as easy to use as mouthwash.

In fact, it is mouthwash.
Faculty from the University at Buffalo School of Dental Medicine soon will begin a pilot study of a mouth rinse that claims to make smoking taste terrible.

Sebastian Ciancio, D.D.S., professor and chair of the Department of Peridontology who has conducted hundreds of product trials and will head this one, said he has seen the product's formula and it looks promising on several fronts.

"It could discourage people from smoking," Ciancio said, "but is also seems to have the potential to decrease plaque and gingivitis. It also may reduce tartar."

Ciancio will begin a small pilot study involving 20 smokers within the next two months to test the product's safety. If it proves to be safe, he will conduct a larger study to determine its effectiveness as a smoking deterrent and as a preventive for plaque and gum disease.

The new mouth rinse is a product of the same creative mind that developed the first Xerox copy paper, Ciancio said. The product's data sheet describes it as a breath-freshening, germ-killing liquid that works like any normal mouthwash with one notable exception: For 5-8 hours after using it, "the taste of cigarette smoke is distorted to the point where the person will not smoke past the first puff."

The mouth rinse doesn't affect the taste of anything but tobacco smoke, the inventor asserts, which makes it a useful long-term deterrent should former smokers be tempted to relapse. The inventor also notes that his product doesn't involve nicotine or any other drug.

"This is especially important for persons who are pregnant or who have undergone heart bypass surgery and can't use any of the currently approved smoking deterrents to help them quit," the inventor notes.

In the never-ending search for better dental products, companies also have contracted with UB's Department of Periodontology to test a new kind of dental floss, which initially will involve a small pilot study, and to conduct larger studies of two new toothpaste formulations.
-end-
Persons interested in volunteering for the smoking-deterrent mouth-rinse study or any of the others may call the UB dental school at 716-829-3850.

University at Buffalo

Related Smoking Articles:

A case where smoking helped
A mutation in the hemoglobin of a young woman in Germany was found to cause her mild anemia.
No safe level of smoking
People who consistently smoked an average of less than one cigarette per day over their lifetime had a 64 percent higher risk of earlier death than people who never smoked.
Nearly half of women who stop smoking during pregnancy go back to smoking soon after baby is born
A major new review published today by the scientific journal Addiction reveals that in studies testing the effectiveness of stop-smoking support for pregnant women, nearly half (43 percent) of the women who managed to stay off cigarettes during the pregnancy went back to smoking within six months of the birth.
If you want to quit smoking, do it now
Smokers who try to cut down the amount they smoke before stopping are less likely to quit than those who choose to quit all in one go, Oxford University researchers have found.
Cochrane news: Have national smoking bans worked in reducing harms in passive smoking?
The most robust evidence yet, published today in the Cochrane Library, suggests that national smoking legislation does reduce the harms of passive smoking, and particularly risks from heart disease.
Advocating for raising the smoking age to 21
Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist Daniel Ouellette, M.D., who during his 31-year career in medicine has seen the harmful effects of smoking on his patients, advocates for raising the smoking age to 21.
Stress main cause of smoking after childbirth
Mothers who quit smoking in pregnancy are more likely to light up again after their baby is born if they feel stressed.
As smoking declines, more are likely to quit
Smokeless tobacco and, more recently, e-cigarettes have been promoted as a harm reduction strategy for smokers who are 'unable or unwilling to quit.' The strategy, embraced by both industry and some public health advocates, is based on the assumption that as smoking declines overall, only those who cannot quit will remain.
Smoking around your toddler could be just as bad as smoking while pregnant
Children whose parents smoked when they were toddlers are likely to have a wider waist and a higher BMI by time they reach ten years of age, reveal researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte Justine Research Centre.
Smoking and angioplasty: Not a good combination
Quitting smoking when you have angioplasty is associated with better quality of life and less chest pain.

Related Smoking Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...