Combined molecular-targeted and hormonal therapies offer promise in treating ovarian cancer

May 08, 2007

Houston - May 08, 2007 -- A combination of molecular-targeted therapy and hormonal therapy may be the most promising area of research for those seeking an effective treatment for ovarian cancer, according to a new review in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer.

"Several clinical trials have confirmed the role of hormone therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer treatment, especially in patients with low-grade tumors," says review author Dr. Siqing Fu, an assistant professor of oncology at the University of Texas at Houston. "However, more research is needed to determine whether combining molecular-targeted therapy with hormonal therapy would be a more effective option."

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of gynecological cancers; approximately 70 percent of patients are diagnosed in the later stages, when the 5-year survival rate drops below 25 percent. Traditional chemotherapy has proven to be generally ineffective against recurrent ovarian cancer, which has led researchers to investigate novel treatments.

"While a cure is unlikely, the goals of treatment are to control tumor-related symptoms and to improve or maintain quality of life," says Dr. Fu. "After surveying the latest research, combined molecular-targeted and hormonal therapy offers the greatest promise in achieving these goals and therefore deserves further investigation."
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This study is published in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact medicalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

Siqing Fu, M.D., Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the department of gynecologic medical oncology at the University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. His research focuses on developing effective therapies for patients with ovarian cancer and other gynecologic malignancies. He can be reached for further questions at siqingfu@mdanderson.org.

International Journal of Gynecological Cancer presents papers from throughout the global community of researchers covering many topics including basic science, epidemiology, diagnostic techniques, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, pathology and experimental studies. The Journal allows you to call on a roster of international experts for the latest research, advice, and knowledge in order to provide the best treatment for your patients. For more information, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com/ijg.

Blackwell Publishing is the world's leading society publisher, partnering with 665 medical, academic, and professional societies. Blackwell publishes over 800 journals and has over 6,000 books in print. The company employs over 1,000 staff members in offices in the US, UK, Australia, China, Singapore, Denmark, Germany, and Japan and officially merged with John Wiley & Sons, Inc.'s Scientific, Technical, and Medical business in February 2007. Blackwell's mission as an expert publisher is to create long-term partnerships with our clients that enhance learning, disseminate research, and improve the quality of professional practice. For more information on Blackwell Publishing, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com or www.blackwell-synergy.com.

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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