Automatic identification of protein's critical features from the structure

May 08, 2007

How we look is of the greatest importance nowadays since it express who we are, but is it really possible to tell the essence of an individual from its form? The answer to that question seems to be related to fashion and glamour, yet a group of scientists from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and the Buck Institute in the USA, were able to address it, although motivated by other reasons than fashion.

In biology, the capacity to establish the function of a molecule, proteins in particular, from its form is relevant to understand how living forms work, and to develop effective treatments and diagnostic tests.

The scientists led by Dr. Gabriel del Río at the Instituto de Fisiologia Celular/UNAM, developed an automatic procedure that allows scientists for the first time to identify the critical elements of proteins from their shape exclusively.
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The following press release refers to an upcoming article in PLoS ONE. The release has been provided by the article authors and/or their institutions. Any opinions expressed in this are the personal views of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of PLoS. PLoS expressly disclaims any and all warranties and liability in connection with the information found in the release and article and your use of such information.

The results will be published in the May 9th issue of the online, peer-reviewed, open-access journal PLoS ONE.

Contact:
Gabriel del Río
Email: gdelrio@ifc.unam.mx

Citation: Cusack MP, Thibert B, Bredesen DE, del Rio G (2007) Efficient Identification of Critical Residues Based Only on Protein Structure by Network Analysis. PLoS ONE 2(5): e421. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000421

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://www.plosone.org/doi/pone.0000421

PRESS ONLY PREVIEW: http://www.plos.org/press/pone-02-05-del-rio.pdf

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