Nav: Home

No developmental differences in children conceived via assisted reproductive technology

May 08, 2019

Parents with children conceived via IVF, IUI or using infertility medication can rest assured that treatment has no impact on childhood development.

In a study from Fertility Centers of Illinois in collaboration with Rush University Medical Center, parents of children conceived spontaneously and through assisted reproductive technology (ART) reported developmental milestones from birth to five years old in the Ovia Parenting app. Developmental milestones were created using CDC guidelines.

Both groups achieved developmental milestones in a similar timeline. A significant difference existed at 12 months where those conceived through ART were more likely to report their child met all milestones than spontaneously conceived children's parents.

Study participants were based in the U.S. and of the 1,881 who completed the survey, 229 (12.2 percent) used ART and 1,652 (87.8 percent) conceived spontaneously. ART methods included infertility medication (91), intrauterine insemination (89), in vitro fertilization (78), and 28 respondents reported more than one method.

Mixed evidence exists regarding the effect of ART on childhood developmental milestones. ART increases the risk of prematurity and low birth weight, both of which are associated with developmental delays.

Other studies have suggested that ART does not have a negative effect on the physical and mental development of children when compared to naturally conceived children, but this is the first study to analyze childhood development from the perspective of the parent.

"Parents spend a lot of time with their children and know their behavior better than anyone, which is why it is so important to analyze development from their perspective," explains Dr. Jennifer Hirshfeld-Cytron, study author and reproductive endocrinologist with Fertility Centers of Illinois. "Many patients don't pursue fertility treatment due to a fear their child will not be 'normal' as a result. This study helps to lay this fear to rest."

According to the CDC, one in eight couples will experience difficulty getting pregnant or sustaining a pregnancy.

Using ART to conceive a baby is increasingly common. In the 2016 CDC ART National Summary Report, the latest reporting available on ART data, approximately 263,577 ART cycles were completed that year. Last year, the global count of babies created using IVF surpassed eight million.

Study findings were presented at the Pacific Coast Reproductive Society Annual Meeting in April.
-end-
Fertility Centers of Illinois (FCI) is one of the leading fertility treatment practices in the United States, providing advanced reproductive endocrinology services for over 30 years with more than 35,000 babies born. With an 11-physician team of nationally and internationally recognized doctors at nine locations who treat thousands of patients each year, the practice has earned a reputation for medical and clinical excellence and continues to invest in the latest state of the art technologies and research. FCI offers a comprehensive range of fertility treatments with an emphasis on in vitro fertilization, third party reproduction, egg donation, gestational carriers, genetic embryo screening, and egg freezing/oocyte vitrification, allowing patients to receive all of their care at one center. As the premier and largest fertility practice in the Midwest region, Fertility Centers of Illinois serves patients in the Chicagoland region, northern Indiana, and southern Wisconsin. Patients receive individualized care with accommodating financial options and a free patient support program. Learn more by calling 877-324-4483 or visiting fcionline.com

Fertility Centers of Illinois

Related Children Articles:

Children living in countryside outperform children living in metropolitan area in motor skills
Residential density is related to children's motor skills, engagement in outdoor play and organised sports. that Finnish children living in the countryside spent more time outdoors and had better motor skills than their age peers in the metropolitan area.
Hispanic and black children more likely to miss school due to eczema than white children
In a study that highlights racial disparities in the everyday impact of eczema, new research shows Hispanic and black children are more likely than white children to miss school due to the chronic skin disease.
Children, their parents, and health professionals often underestimate children's higher weight status
More than half of parents underestimated their children's classification as overweight or obese -- children themselves and health professionals also share this misperception, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, UK (April 28-May 1).
Children with autism are in 'in-tune' with mom's feelings like other children
New research addresses limitations of prior autism spectrum disorder (ASD) studies on facial emotion recognition by using five distinct facial emotions in unfamiliar and familiar (mom) faces to test the influence of familiarity in children with and without ASD.
Fractures in children often indicate abuse
Physical abuse in children often remains undetected. Atypical fractures may indicate such abuse.
More Children News and Children Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...