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Fibro-adipose vascular anomaly: Old wine or new cocktail?

May 08, 2019

Leesburg, VA, May 8, 2019--Unique clinico-radiological features of a provisionally unclassified vascular anomaly can assist radiologists in identifying this uncommon distinct entity, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, set for May 5-10 in Honolulu, HI.

The study was conducted to evaluate the clinical and radiological features of fibro-adipose vascular anomaly (FAVA) including the use of advanced imaging techniques.

FAVA is a recently described soft-tissue vascular lesion, frequently misdiagnosed as venous malformation, mesenchymal tumor, or intramuscular hemangioma and refractory to conventional modalities of treatment. In a retrospective review of hospital records, the clinical and imaging findings of 20 patients were reviewed to construct a profile of the unique clinico-radiological features of FAVA.

The typical clinical profile is a young patient with painful intramuscular lesion in the extremities, causing contractures. The lesion is solid-appearing with heterogeneous echotexture on ultrasound, soft on elastography, and shows progressive heterogeneous enhancement on contrast ultrasound and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with associated phlebectasia.

"FAVA is a new and novel entity that the radiologists should be aware of," said Dr. Ankur Goyal, author of the study "as they may be first ones to suggest this possibility."
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With educational activities representing the entire spectrum of radiology, ARRS will host leading radiologists from around the world at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, May 5-10, at the Hawaii Convention Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. For more information, visit: http://www.arrs.org/am19.

American Roentgen Ray Society

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