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USDA announces $2.4 million in available funding to relieve veterinary shortages

May 09, 2016

WASHINGTON, May 9, 2016- The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced $2.4 million in available funding to relieve veterinarian shortage situations through education, extension and training as well as support for veterinary practices in designated shortage areas. This funding is was authorized by the Veterinary Services Grant Program (VSGP) in the 2014 Farm Bill.

"These funds support activities for veterinarians and veterinary technicians, helping them gain the specialized skills to address shortages in parts of the country," said NIFA Director Sonny Ramaswamy. "Funds are also available for establishing or expanding veterinary practices in underserved rural areas."

The competitive VSGP grants support activities to develop, implement, and sustain veterinary services through education, training, recruitment, and retention of veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and students of veterinary medicine and veterinary technology. Grants will also be made to establish or expand veterinary practices in rural areas.

The VSGP is authorized by Section 7104 of the 2014 Farm Bill and received a first-time appropriation of $2.5 million in the FY16 federal budget.
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NIFA will host three Veterinary Services Grant Program webinars, May 10, 11 and 15, to provide information to applicants and address their questions.

Applications are due June 17, 2016. See the request for applications for more information.

Since 2009, NIFA has invested in and advanced innovative and transformative initiatives to solve societal challenges and ensure the long-term viability of agriculture. NIFA's integrated research, education, and extension programs, supporting the best and brightest scientists and extension personnel, have resulted in user-inspired, groundbreaking discoveries that are combating childhood obesity, improving and sustaining rural economic growth, addressing water availability issues, increasing food production, finding new sources of energy, mitigating climate variability, and ensuring food safety. To learn more about NIFA's impact on agricultural science, visit http://www.nifa.usda.gov/impacts, sign up for email updates, or follow us on Twitter @usda_NIFA, #NIFAimpacts.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Stop 9410, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call toll-free at (866) 632-9992 (English) or (800) 877-8339 (TDD) or (866) 377-8642 (English Federal-relay) or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish Federal-relay).

National Institute of Food and Agriculture

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