Nav: Home

How will people interact with technology in the future?

May 09, 2016

New research that discusses how people will interact with technology in the future will be presented this week at one of the world's most important conferences on human-computer interfaces, ACM CHI 2016, in San Jose, USA [7-12 May].

A team of researchers led by Professor Mike Fraser and Dr Anne Roudaut from Bristol University's Bristol Interaction Group (BIG) group, will present six papers at the international conference. The conference brings together researchers from universities, corporations and start-ups from across the world and could change the way people interact and collaborate in the future.

The research being presented, which could be future applications, includes:

PowerShake - power transfer interactions for mobile devices

Current devices have limited battery life, typically lasting less than one day. This can lead to situations where critical tasks, such as making an emergency phone call, are not possible. PowerShake is an exploration of power as a shareable commodity between mobile and wearable devices using wireless power transfer to enable power-sharing on the go. Other devices that people may have with them, such as a smartwatch or camera, may have sufficient battery to support this emergency task.

Investigating text legibility on non-rectangular displays

Emerging technologies allow for the creation of non-rectangular displays with unlimited constraints in shape. In this paper, the researchers investigate how to display text on such free-form displays.

EMPress - practical hand gesture classification with wrist-mounted electromyography (EMG) and pressure sensing

Practical wearable gesture tracking requires that sensors align with existing ergonomic device forms. This paper shows that combining EMG and pressure data sensed only at the wrist can support accurate classification of hand gestures. The EMPress technique senses both finger movements and rotations around the wrist and forearm, covering a wide range of gestures.

GauntLev - a wearable to manipulate free-floating objects

GauntLev is a tool that is able to generate remote forces that would allow people to handle dangerous materials and adrift objects in zero-g environments without contact or constrictions. The research team found basic manoeuvres can be performed when acoustic levitators are attached to moving hands. A Gauntlet of Levitation and a sonic screwdriver will be presented showing their manoeuvres for capturing, moving, transferring and combining particles.

Sustainable interaction design, cloud services and the digital infrastructure

Design-for-environment methods tend to focus on the impact of device manufacturing and use. However, nowadays significant environmental impact comes from the infrastructure which provides services the device enables. The paper, which has won a Best Paper award, offers an analysis of the different ways in which design decisions result in environmental impacts through their use of the digital infrastructure, and extend Blevis' Sustainable Interaction Design rubric to incorporate considerations of the digital infrastructure.

Shared language and the design of home healthcare technology

This paper explores the importance of language for the design of smart home technologies for healthcare. The research team present data gathered through an ethnographic study and through meetings with user advisory groups that show the need for a shared language that avoids the use of jargon, ambiguous words, and emotive words. A workshop with researchers who are developing smart health technologies and a focus group with end users were run, where the focus was on generating a shared language.

Dr Anne Roudaut, Lecturer from the University's Department of Computer Science and BIG group, said: "The body of research we are presenting shows that human-computer interfaces have an important role to play in how people will interact and use technology in the future."
-end-


University of Bristol

Related Language Articles:

The world's most spoken language is...'Terpene'
If you're small, smells are a good way to stand out.
Study analyzes what 'a' and 'the' tell us about language acquisition
A study co-authored by an MIT professor suggests that experience is an important component of early-childhood language usage although it doesn't necessarily account for all of a child's language facility.
Why do people switch their language?
Due to increasing globalization, the linguistic landscape of our world is changing; many people give up use of one language in favor of another.
Discovering what shapes language diversity
A research team led by Colorado State University is the first to use a form of simulation modeling to study the processes that shape language diversity patterns.
'Speaking my language': Method helps prepare teachers of dual language learners
Researchers at Lehigh University, led by L. Brook Sawyer and Patricia H.
More Language News and Language Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...