Nav: Home

Scientists discover a new class of single-atom nanozymes

May 09, 2019

Nanozymes - catalytic nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics - offer the advantage of low cost, high stability, tunable catalytic activity and ease of mass production. For these reasons, they have been widely applied in biosensing, therapeutics and environmental protection.

However, the low density of active sites in nanozymes is related to much lower catalytic activity than with natural enzymes. In addition, their inhomogeneous elemental composition and facet structure-derived intricate catalytic mechanisms seriously restrict the extensive application of conventional nanozymes.

A research team led by Prof. DONG Shaojun from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a new class of single-atom nanozymes, which integrates state-of-the-art single-atom technology with intrinsic enzyme-like active sites.

The researchers synthesized single-atom nanozymes with carbon nanoframe-confined axial N-coordinated FeN5 centers (FeN5 SA/CNF). Theoretical calculations and experimental studies indicated that the highest oxidase-like activity of FeN5 SA/CNF was derived from the enzyme-like active sites and catalytic mechanisms.

The atomically dispersed metal centers maximized the atomic utilization efficiency and density of the active sites. The well-defined coordination structure provided a clear experimental model for mechanism investigation.

The current results suggest that the single-atom nanozymes overcame the critical drawbacks of conventional nanozymes. In addition, mimicking the active sites of natural enzymes appears to be an efficient method for the synthesis of single-atom nanozymes with high activity and clear mechanism.

Furthermore, the catalytic property and the mechanism of single-atom nanozymes depend mainly upon the steric configuration of active centers, rather than the size, structure or facet of the supports. Thus, through altering the supported nanomaterials, certain types of active sites can be extended to general applications with definite enzyme-like mechanisms.

The study, published in Science Advances, shows that defined single-atom nanozymes provide a new perspective on the catalytic mechanism and rational design of nanozymes. They also show great potential for becoming the next generation of nanozymes.
-end-


Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters

Related Mechanism Articles:

Parkinson's dyskinesia mechanism explained
The mechanism underlying Parkinson's dyskinesia has been unknown, until now.
A cellular mechanism protecting against cancer
Susanne Hellmuth and Olaf Stemmann from the University of Bayreuth have discovered a natural protective mechanism that leads to the programmed death of potentially diseased cells.
New repair mechanism for DNA breaks
Researchers from the University of Seville and the Andalusian Centre of Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (CABIMER) have identified new factors that are necessary for the repair of these breaks.
Antibiotics with novel mechanism of action discovered
Many life-threatening bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to existing antibiotics.
New protein-sensing mechanism discovered
In a stunning discovery, molecular biologists from the University of Konstanz and ETH Zurich have been able to demonstrate that the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) senses newly synthesized proteins upon birth inside the ribosomal tunnel.
New deactivation mechanism for switch proteins detected
A new mechanism for the deactivation of switch proteins has been identified by researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum, headed by Professor Klaus Gerwert and Dr.
A new mechanism for accessing damaged DNA
UV light damages the DNA of skin cells, which can lead to cancer.
New mechanism of bone growth discovered
In a paper published in Nature, researchers at Karolinska Institutet report that bone growth in mice takes place in accordance with the same principles as when new cells are constantly produced in blood, skin and other tissue.
An elegant mechanism
Researchers discovered a connection between metabolite and protein transport in the powerhouse of the cell.
A new mechanism in the control of inflammation
Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have discovered a new inflammation control mechanism that shows how the damage caused by the immune response can be controlled.
More Mechanism News and Mechanism Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Our Relationship With Water
We need water to live. But with rising seas and so many lacking clean water – water is in crisis and so are we. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around restoring our relationship with water. Guests on the show include legal scholar Kelsey Leonard, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, and community organizer Colette Pichon Battle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#568 Poker Face Psychology
Anyone who's seen pop culture depictions of poker might think statistics and math is the only way to get ahead. But no, there's psychology too. Author Maria Konnikova took her Ph.D. in psychology to the poker table, and turned out to be good. So good, she went pro in poker, and learned all about her own biases on the way. We're talking about her new book "The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.