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Fragmented turtles

May 09, 2019

Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia.

They found that habitat loss and modification is restricting gene flow, causing the fragmentation of the species into at least six populations, some of which are suffering from genetic erosion, isolation, small effective population sizes, and inbreeding.

The scientists recommend gene flow restoration via genetic rescue to counteract these threats, and provide guidance for this strategy.
-end-


Wildlife Conservation Society

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