Event showcases atomic resolution microscopy

May 10, 2005

A conference to commemorate the historical development of atomic resolution microscopy will be held June 15-17 at the Nittany Lion Inn on the University Park campus in State College.

The Penn State Physics Department, in association with the International Field Emission Society, will hold the "Fiftieth Anniversary of Atomic Resolution Microscopy" to celebrate the earliest and later atomic-scale imaging and related analytical techniques, up to the present. Eminent scientists will address the historical origins and applications of all the atomic-scale imaging and related techniques.

Members of the press are invited to learn how atomic scale imaging affects everyday life-everything from cell phones to airplanes to drugs require this capability. The celebration, which will be of great interest to microscopists, materials scientists and surface scientists, will emphasize the historic significance of the 50th anniversary of the first time that atoms were resolved by humans. Registration information can be obtained at http://www.outreach.psu.edu/C&I/AtomicResolution/ or by calling 814-863-5110.
-end-


Penn State

Related Cell Phones Articles from Brightsurf:

Smart phones are empowering women worldwide
By giving women access to information they otherwise wouldn't have, mobile phones are transforming lives.

National survey shows different bacteria on cell phones and shoes
The largest study of its kind in the US shows thousands of different types of bacteria living on cell phones and shoes, including groups that have barely been studied by scientists.

New lithium batteries from used cell phones
Research from the University of Cordoba (Spain) and San Luis University (Argentina) was able to reuse graphite from cell phones to manufacture environmentally friendly batteries.

Thyroid cancer, genetic variations, cell phones linked in YSPH study
Radiation from cell phones is associated with higher rates of thyroid cancer among people with genetic variations in specific genes, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health finds.

Dissemination of pathogenic bacteria by university student's cell phones
New research has demonstrated the presence of S. aureus in 40% of the cell phones of students sampled at a university.

'Technoference': We're more tired & less productive because of our phones
An Australian survey of 709 mobile phone users (aged 18 to 83), led by Queensland University of Technology, has found one in five women and one in eight men are losing sleep due to bad phone habits.

Research could lead to more durable cell phones and power lines
Researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a way to make cell phones and power lines more durable. 

Cell phones without annual plans offer limited help to homeless people
The vast majority of older homeless adults have access to mobile phones, but they are usually basic phones, without annual contracts that let them keep stable numbers, and thus are only practical for one-way communication, according to a UC San Francisco study of how homeless people use mobile and Internet technology.

Laws designed to ban or curb drivers' use of cell phones are saving motorcyclists' lives
Laws to ban or curb drivers' use of cell phones and other handheld devices have greatly reduced the rate of fatalities for motorcyclists, according to a new study from Florida Atlantic University and the University of Miami.

Toxic chemicals calling: Cell phones as a source of flame retardants
New research by environmental scientists at the University of Toronto suggests that the exterior of mobile phones could be a source of toxic chemicals, or at least an aggregate indicator of the chemicals to which people are exposed on a daily basis.

Read More: Cell Phones News and Cell Phones Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.